Sally Mangold and Richard L. Welsh Are the Two Newest Inductees to the Hall of Fame for Leaders and Legends of the Blindness Field, Which Is Housed at the American Printing House for the Blind (APH) in Louisville, Kentucky

Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, June 2008 | Go to article overview

Sally Mangold and Richard L. Welsh Are the Two Newest Inductees to the Hall of Fame for Leaders and Legends of the Blindness Field, Which Is Housed at the American Printing House for the Blind (APH) in Louisville, Kentucky


Sally Mangold and Richard L. Welsh are the two newest inductees to the Hall of Fame for Leaders and Legends of the Blindness Field, which is housed at the American Printing House for the Blind (APH) in Louisville, Kentucky. Founded in 2001 to preserve the tradition of excellence of the field manifested by specific North Americans, the 2008 inductees were selected by a nine-member advisory board. Drs. Mangold and Welsh will be inducted into the Hall of Fame on October 3, 2008, in conjunction with APH's Annual Meeting of Ex Officio Trustees and Special Guests.

For more than 40 years, Sally Mangold dedicated her professional life to the field of blindness and was recognized nationally and internationally for her work. Through her publications on braille instruction and teaching techniques, she was a passionate proponent of braille literacy. Sally Mangold worked as a resource room teacher for students with visual impairments for 18 years, and was professor and professor emerita at San Francisco State University (SFSU). Dr. Mangold founded--along with her husband, Phil Mangold--Exceptional Teaching Aids, a company that continues to publish instructional materials for individuals of all ages who are blind and visually impaired, as well as for the population that serves them. Her highly regarded Mangold Developmental Program of Tactile Perception and Braille Letter Recognition, an instructional manual to assist teachers with beginning braille readers, has been published in eight languages. Her work in developing the SAL (Speech Assisted Learning) System--a portable, interactive computer-based braille learning station--has been critically recognized as an innovative way for children and adults who are blind or visually impaired to learn braille. Dr. Mangold graduated from San Francisco State University (SFSU) and earned a doctorate in special education from the University of California, Berkeley. She received the 2003 Migel Medal, the highest honor in the blindness field, from the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) in November 2004. In presenting the 2003 Migel Professional Award to Dr. Mangold, Phil Hatlen, then superintendent of the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, stated:

   .... Sally was one of the most successful,
   inspired teachers I have ever known.... As
   a professor at SFSU, she was imaginative and
   creative in her approaches to providing future
   teachers with not only skills and knowledge,
   but with pride and passion. … 

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Sally Mangold and Richard L. Welsh Are the Two Newest Inductees to the Hall of Fame for Leaders and Legends of the Blindness Field, Which Is Housed at the American Printing House for the Blind (APH) in Louisville, Kentucky
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