Bold Mix Exhibit Shows How Great Depression Brought Black, Jewish Artists Together

By Murphy, Jean | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 10, 2008 | Go to article overview

Bold Mix Exhibit Shows How Great Depression Brought Black, Jewish Artists Together


Murphy, Jean, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Jean Murphy Daily Herald Correspondent

The Great Depression is portrayed in history as a time of terrible hunger and desperation. And it was.

But there were also positive outcomes from that difficult decade.

Huge public works projects brought electricity to Appalachia and many other remote areas of the country. Dams and bridges were built. The government decided to insure individuals' bank deposits. Social Security was born.

And in Chicago, two groups of artists - immigrant Jews whose families had run from pogroms in Russia and eastern Europe and blacks who had moved from the South to avoid lynch mobs, Jim Crow laws and the boll weevil insect which destroyed the cotton crop - met and cooperated.

For years that association was forgotten or ignored and the individual pieces of art were distributed far and wide to museums and private collectors.

But now, for the first time, they have been tracked down and brought together for an exhibit. The Koehnline Museum of Arts at Oakton Community College in Des Plaines is displaying the art through March 28 in an exhibit titled "Convergence: Jewish and African-American Artists in Depression-era Chicago." The museum, located at 1600 E. Golf Road, Des Plaines, is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, and from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays.

The exhibit features paintings, sculptures and works on paper focusing on Chicago's urban landscape, the state of a nation facing a depression and the human factor. Some of the later pieces also depict civil and social rights struggles, according to Nathan Harpaz, curator of the Koehnline.

Sixty-six pieces were assembled from seven different museums and a number of private collections for the exhibit, Harpaz said.

It took two years to track down and assemble the exhibit, working like detectives, following various leads, he admitted.

"Many of these pieces have never been shown publicly before because they are owned by relatives of the artists and they were reluctant to part with them, even for a short time," Harpaz said.

So while he expects many requests for the exhibit to travel to other museums after its time at Oakton, Harpaz admitted that it would be difficult to get all of the different sources to agree to such a tour. Consequently, this will probably be the only time the exhibit will be shown in its entirety.

The story of the exhibit began several years ago when the Koehnline was given a portfolio of wood cuts made by 14 Jewish artists in Chicago in 1937, Harpaz explained. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Bold Mix Exhibit Shows How Great Depression Brought Black, Jewish Artists Together
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.