The Monist: Vol. 91, No. 2, April 2008

The Review of Metaphysics, June 2008 | Go to article overview

The Monist: Vol. 91, No. 2, April 2008


Against Consciousness Chauvinism, ITAY SHANI

Consciousness chauvinism is the view that only conscious psychological states are intrinsically mental and that the mentality of unconscious psychological states is derived from the authentic mentality that is immanent to consciousness. In this paper, the author urges caution against this view, as well as against the somewhat weaker thesis of intentional dualism, the thesis that the intentional profile of unconscious mental states is categorically distinct from that of conscious intentional states. Examining in some detail the consciousness-chauvinist, and intentional-dualist, claims of John Searle (1992) and Colin McGinn (1988), the author argues that the initial plausibility of their views quickly deteriorates once greater attention is paid to the embodiment of intentionality--conscious and unconscious.

Phenomenal Intentionality Meets the Extended, URIAH KRIEGAL

Over the last quarter of the twentieth century, an orthodoxy of sorts had gelled in the philosophy of mind around a kind of psychological externalism, the idea that some mental states individuate sensitively to extra-cranial factors. More recently, two trends of thought have departed from this young orthodoxy in opposite directions. On the one hand, a cluster of ideas captured in such phrases as "extended mind," "embodied cognition," and "enactive consciousness" proclaim to go further in externalizing the mind; call this the extended mind outlook. On the other hand, a constellation of ideas surrounding the notion of "phenomenal intentionality" has ventured to roll back some of the most important aspects of psychological externalism; call this the phenomenal intentionality outlook. In this paper, we examine the relationship between these two opposing trends. The authors will argue that the phenomenal intentionality outlook can accommodate the letter of the so-called extended mind hypothesis, while renouncing the spirit with which it is often embraced, thus neutralizing the alleged philosophical significance of the extended mind hypothesis. The purpose of this exercise is to show that there is nothing in the letter of the extended mind hypothesis that undermines a more traditional, strongly internalist, broadly Cartesian picture of the mind.

The Interdependence of Phenomenology and Intentionality, ADAM PAUTZ

Some philosophers have recently argued for prioritism: phenomenology is explanatorily prior to intentionality. This view may seem in conflict with intentionalism, which explains phenomenology in terms of intentionality. This paper puts forward a view that combines elements of both views. The author develops an argument for intentionalism that depends on a claim that is in the same spirit of prioritism, namely that experiences play a role in grounding the intentionality of other mental states, especially perceptual beliefs. The best account of how experiences can play this explanatory role, the author argues, is that they are themselves intentional states of a kind more basic than belief. This intentionalist view rules out what he will call "global prioritism." However, it is consistent with "restricted prioritism."

Phenomenal Intentionality without Compromise, KATALIN FARKAS

In recent years, several philosophers have defended the idea of phenomenal intentionality: the intrinsic directedness of certain conscious mental events which is inseparable from these events' phenomenal character. …

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The Monist: Vol. 91, No. 2, April 2008
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