Philosophy: Vol. 83, No. 2

The Review of Metaphysics, June 2008 | Go to article overview

Philosophy: Vol. 83, No. 2


How We Trust One Another, OSWALD HANFLING

How is the possibility of promising to be explained without circularity? Appeal is made to the role of natural inclinations in linguistic behavior, which presupposes truth telling and promise keeping, and also to the social functions of human language which go beyond signaling and transmitting information and which are prior to any explicit conventions. Although promises are broken and lies told, we all have the right to feel resentment when these things happen.

Knowledge of Necessity: Logical Positivism and Kripkean Essentialism, STEPHEN K. McLEOD

By the lights of a central logical positivist thesis in modal epistemology, for every necessary truth that we know, we know it a priori and for every contingent truth that we know, we know it a posteriori. Kripke attacks on both flanks, arguing that we know necessary a posteriori truths and that we probably know contingent a priori truths. In a reflection of Kripke's confidence in his own arguments, the first of these Kripkean claims is far more widely accepted than the second. Contrary to received opinion, the paper argues, the considerations Kripke adduces concerning truths purported to be necessary a posteriori do not disprove the logical positivist thesis that necessary truth and a priori truth are co-extensive.

Studying Perception, OLLI LAGERSPETZ

Empirical studies of perception must use the logic of everyday non-technical conceptions of perception as their unquestioned background. This is because the phenomena to be studied are defined and individuated on the basis of such basic understanding. Thus the methods of neurobiology exclude reductionist accounts from the outset, implicitly if not explicitly. It is further argued that the concepts of neural and mental representation, while not confused per se, presuppose a general picture where perception as a whole is viewed in the light of teleology. References are made to discussions by Bennett and Hacker, Paul Churchland, and Peter Winch.

False Emotions, TONY MILLIGAN

This article sets out an account of false emotions and focuses upon the example of false grief. Widespread but short-lived mourning for well known public figures involves false grief on the part of at least some mourners. …

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Philosophy: Vol. 83, No. 2
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