Just Where Did My Pension Go?

Daily Mail (London), July 23, 2008 | Go to article overview

Just Where Did My Pension Go?


Byline: Margaret Stone

IN FEBRUARY 1971, I started a Temple Bar pension policy with Legal & General in Rhodesia, now Zimbabwe.

I invested until June 1979, when the farming situation there became impossible. My dairy herd was stolen in one night and the farmhouse torched a short while after. I left for South Africa and made the policy 'paid up', meaning I should still earn bonuses but would no longer contribute to it. In December 1989, I received details showing bonuses had been added. The policy is due to mature in February 2010. Does it have any value?

R. S. B., Ludlow, Shropshire.

LEGAL & GENERAL has made extensive investigations into finding your pension. Unfortunately, your pension became the property of the Zimbabwean government when it nationalised the Zimbabwean/Rhodesian financial services industry in the 1980s.

From then, Legal & General could no longer manage its pension business in Zimbabwe as it had no access to the pension fund or benefits as they became payable.

L& G concludes that your only recourse is to contact the Zimbabwean government to see if you are due any benefits or compensation. I am afraid I think this would be a waste of time.

I am sorry to come back with such a negative response, but I don't think you expected a great result.

I ORDERED three items of clothing from the Damart catalogue costing [pounds sterling]54.97 (including [pounds sterling]2 postage). One was unavailable. The alternative they sent was the wrong size and colour.

I didn't want it; nor did I want the other pieces as they had been chosen as an outfit. I returned the goods, but did not get my refund. Eventually, a cheque for [pounds sterling]19.99 arrived, then another for [pounds sterling]12.99. But I am still [pounds sterling]19.99 out of pocket. I am an 80-year old widow so no sum is unimportant.

Mrs E.P., Derby.

PART of your problem is that you did not send back all three items at the same time. As a result, each refund, including the last one (which you should now have) was handled separately. …

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