Behavioral Geography and the Theoretical/Quantitative Revolution

By Golledge, Reginald G. | Geographical Analysis, July 2008 | Go to article overview

Behavioral Geography and the Theoretical/Quantitative Revolution


Golledge, Reginald G., Geographical Analysis


Beginning with a position statement about the serendipitous nature of the emergence of both normative theory and quantitative methods in Geography, this chapter details the nature of the various contributions to both areas by Behavioral Geographers. Contributions to data collection and both qualitative and quantitative analysis are reviewed for the periods 1960 to the present. Particular emphasis is placed on contributions made by those interested in decision making and choice behavior, particularly in terms of the role of Spatial Cognition (theory and methods) in fostering and extending those dual "revolutions." Other themes emphasize the development of avenues of publication from the "gray literature" of Department Discussion Papers to the emergence of the journal Geographical Analysis and support by geographers for a variety of interdisciplinary journals. A final focus is on the great variety of themes pursued by the Behavioral Geographer of today, and some suggestions are made regarding possible avenues for future research.

Introduction

The late 1950s and early 1960s revealed the beginnings of a paradigm shift in Geography. This shift included a movement from descriptive to theoretical emphasis, and a consequent (and necessary) extension of geographic methods into the quantitative realm. Traditionally labeled the "Quantitative Revolution," I have always believed that it was equally a theoretical revolution as much as a quantitative revolution. My reasons are straightforward: (1) the late 1950s saw the introduction of agricultural, industrial, and urban location theory into Geography; (2) coincidentally, Walter Isard published an important book on Location and Space-Economy (1956) in which he examined the nature and potential applications of location theory in a spatial and regional context. Research into the theory and applications of urban systems and central place theory were prominent under the leadership of William Garrison and his outstanding group of graduate student researchers at the University of Washington, Seattle (see Garrison 1960). Research into the theory and applications (post hoc) of agricultural and industrial location decisions were prominent under the leadership of Harold H. McCarty at the University of lowa (see McCarty, Hook, and Knos 1956). Transportation theory and modeling was prominent at Chicago (Harold Mayer: see Mayer and Kohn 1960) and Northwestern (Edward J. Taaffe: see Taaffe, Morill and Gould 1963). The various coworkers and disciples of these early leaders spread the revolution beyond the original centers to Michigan, Pittsburgh, Penn State, Illinois, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Indiana, Michigan State, and Ohio State--that is a concentration of effort in the Big 10 universities. William Bunge's book Theoretical Geography (1962) provided an outstanding stimulus for extending theoretical thinking deeper and deeper into traditional areas of geographical interest, including topics such as intraurban movement and migration (Pitts 1962; Boyce and Clark 1963; Morrill 1963; Clark 1965; Brown 1968; Moore 1970; and others), settlement patterns and consumer behavior (Berry 1961; King 1961; Tennant 1962; Pred 1964; Rushton 1964; Barnum, Kasperson, and Kiuchi 1965; Golledge 1966; Thomas 1968; Simmons 1974; and others), transportation (Gould 1959; Marble 1959; Kansky 1963; Smith, Taafe, and King 1968; Hanson 1970; etc.), regional scientists (such as Stevens [Stevens and Brackett 1967] and Boyce [Boyce and Clark 1963]), and urban structure (including regional scientists Alonso [1960] and others). The outcome of all this was the rapid spread of interest in spatial theory, spatial analysis, and computational methods and models.

But this explosion of new interest also stimulated many other new research directions in both Human and Physical Geography (see Chorley and Haggett 1967). Much of this spread was by person-to-person interactions and exchange (Hagerstrand 1957, 1970, 1973). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Behavioral Geography and the Theoretical/Quantitative Revolution
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.