HSE Move Endangers Women

Daily Mail (London), August 6, 2008 | Go to article overview

HSE Move Endangers Women


Byline: JOE HIGGINS

THE incremental privatisation of areas of the Health Services, relentlessly pushed along under the Government of Cowen, Harney and Gormley, is sometimes referred as the Americanisation of the Irish health system.

What has not really registered with most people is, that it is literally the case that one crucial area of Health is being moved to the United States, resulting in a disastrous loss of critical areas of expertise to the Irish Health Service.

Screening for cervical cancer is a vital service to drastically reduce the development of this awful disease in Irish women. A national screening programme is about to be implemented to include every woman between the ages of 25 and 60 who will be tested every three to five years, depending on age.

The first step involves taking a scraping of cells from the cervix (neck of the uterus). The next step is really crucial. It involves the examination, under a microscope, of the test cells by a scientist who is checking for abnormalities that would indicate a danger of cancer developing.

This is a very specialised branch of medical laboratory science called cervical cytology. Some 300,000 tests will be examined each year from now on. Incredibly, the Health Service Executive has decided that, instead of laboratories in Irish public hospitals doing the tests and being given the resources to do them, they will be sent, for at least the next two years, to a private company in the U.S., Quest Diagnostics Inc.

The consequences of this decision are calamitous for the public health system here. Until now, cervical cytology has been an important part of the work of public hospital laboratories. Now, however, because of the HSE decision, staff in these labs will have to be redeployed out of the Cytology Departments, a process that is already underway.

This means that in a few years when a new tender is circulated for the following years tests, no Irish public hospital will be able to apply as they will not have the expert personnel or capacity in their Cytology Department.

By any standards this is a reckless decision. It could mean a permanent loss of specialised skills in this State especially in the public health service. This in turn would mean a permanent privatisation of the entire cervical cancer screening programme. And not only privatisation, but the transfer to the United States, thousands of miles from here, of a crucial function of the health service that is critically important for women in Ireland. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

HSE Move Endangers Women
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.