Florida Colleges Wary of Losing Talented Faculty; Research Scientists May Be Tempted by Higher Salaries in Other States

By Aasen, Adam | The Florida Times Union, August 7, 2008 | Go to article overview

Florida Colleges Wary of Losing Talented Faculty; Research Scientists May Be Tempted by Higher Salaries in Other States


Aasen, Adam, The Florida Times Union


Byline: ADAM AASEN

There's recent concern among some college leaders in Florida that the state's best faculty might be going elsewhere for more money.

Due to the state's budget crisis -- causing faculty to be laid off at schools such as the University of Florida -- these leaders worry public universities can't afford to match counteroffers from wealthy out-of-state schools.

Erskine Bowles, president of the University of North Carolina system and a former White House chief of staff to President Clinton, told Florida Chamber of Commerce President Mark Wilson that there's good reason to be worried.

"My office is flooded with resumes from your best [research] scientists and we are flat out going to hire them away from your universities if you don't get your act together in Florida," he said in April.

It wasn't specified what Bowles meant by "get your act together," but on average UNC-Chapel Hill paid its professors $138,500 last year, compared with $109,300 at UF.

Rumors started to fly that UNC had "a list" of professors it wanted to steal. No such list has been confirmed, but the University of North Florida's board of trustees still discussed it at a budget meeting this summer. Provost Mark Workman said he's concerned that UNF might lose its top researchers down the road because there is less money available to match other schools' offers.

Most of the concerns are for the future because UNF and UF representatives couldn't say exactly how many faculty members have been lost directly because of pay or if it's unusual compared with other years.

About 12 teachers left UNF last year, but it's unknown if it was because of salary concerns, said UNF spokeswoman Sharon Ashton. UNF averages five to 10 faculty departures a year for other jobs, she said.

NO MERIT PAY AT UNF

UNF offers increased research dollars to some top faculty, which could entice them to stay, but a faculty union agreement prevents UNF from giving raises to select professors to reward good work, otherwise known as merit pay. Raises must be made across the board or to match an offer from another school. Raises can't be made to prevent a professor from seeking outside opportunities.

Workman said if a professor receives a better opportunity at a larger school, UNF doesn't engage in a battle over salary.

"I'm not a proponent of counteroffers," he said. "I think it's unfair to our outstanding faculty who aren't searching for other opportunities."

UF President Bernie Machen was so concerned about losing top professors and researchers that he announced a proposed 3 percent faculty merit raise pool on July 25. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Florida Colleges Wary of Losing Talented Faculty; Research Scientists May Be Tempted by Higher Salaries in Other States
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.