Guerrilla Girls Unmask Sexism and Racism

By Insprucker, Mary Jekielek | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 28, 2008 | Go to article overview

Guerrilla Girls Unmask Sexism and Racism


Insprucker, Mary Jekielek, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Mary Jekielek Insprucker Daily Herald Correspondent

Gloria Steinem would be proud.

In the true spirit of feminism, Oakton Community College will host "The Guerrilla Girls," which exposes sexism, racism and politics in the art and film worlds, and culture overall.

Presented as part of Women's History Month, the lecture performance workshop will approach these serious subjects in a humorous way.

The Guerrilla Girls, who wear gorilla masks during their performances to focus on the issues rather than their personalities, take the names of dead women artists as pseudonyms during their appearance.

"Certainly the group is one of the most significant forces in recent years in terms of opening up issues about women artists, presently and historically," said Kathleen Carot, coordinator of Women's Studies at the college. "They use humor, lecture, stand up, and visual aides to approach the subjects in a fun way, like you've never seen before."

Calvert Miles, 18, of Homewood plans to attend the event for just those reasons.

"I actually think there should be more women in art, because many men get their inspiration from women," Miles said. "I want to attend the lecture to see how women view the world."

Carot explained she attempted to get The Guerrilla Girls to come to Oakton in the past. However, financing and scheduling hindered her efforts.

"The show will include videotape and a PowerPoint presentation. We will interact with the audience in jungle drag," said a performer from the show, who would only respond in the character of artist Frida Kahlo. "We will make the audience laugh through a skit and conversation dealing with feminism and discrimination. …

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