Kmart Boycott Spreads Nationally: Employees at North Carolina Retailer Charge Wage/race Discrimination

By Ginburg, Yana | Black Enterprise, July 1996 | Go to article overview

Kmart Boycott Spreads Nationally: Employees at North Carolina Retailer Charge Wage/race Discrimination


Ginburg, Yana, Black Enterprise


In its national TV ads, Kmart promotes itself as a consumer-friendly store always giving the very best deals to its customers. But a growing number of Kmart employees in Greensboro, North Carolina, are saying the store needs to start taking better care of its own personnel.

Efforts are under way to expand a grass-roots boycott that started in Greensboro to draw national attention to alleged pay disparities at Kmart's North Carolina distribution center. There are also charges that employees in Greensboro have been passed over for promotions because of race.

Kmart, the nation's second largest retailer, opened the Greensboro center in April 1992. Of its 13 national distribution centers, this is the only one with a majority of African American workers and the only one that has voted to unionize. Since 1993, the Union of Needle Trades, Industrial and Textile Employees (UNITE) has been negotiating with Kmart, but the 550 employees have been working without a contract.

The dispute escalated in the spring of 1994, after a series of boycotts and peaceful demonstrations in Greensboro led to several arrests. In recent weeks, the demonstrations have spread to Atlanta, Chicago, Memphis, Norfolk, Houston and Cleveland, attracting 2,000 to 3,000 supporters. Kmart raised its wages across-the-board in Greensboro by 50 cents in March, bringing the pay scale up to $7.25 to $9 an hour. But workers charge that even with the raise, this is still as much as $4 an hour less than what employees at the other national Kmart centers earn.

Deborah Compton-Holt, 44, is one of five employees who have filed a lawsuit against the retailer claiming they were passed over for promotions because of race. "We are not going to stop until we get parity," Compton-Holt says.

"Our hope is that not just Kmart, but other companies will be on alert," says the Rev. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Kmart Boycott Spreads Nationally: Employees at North Carolina Retailer Charge Wage/race Discrimination
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.