Getting to Know Chia Youyee Vang

By Lum, Lydia | Diverse Issues in Higher Education, August 7, 2008 | Go to article overview

Getting to Know Chia Youyee Vang


Lum, Lydia, Diverse Issues in Higher Education


When her book Hmong in Minnesota published earlier this year, Dr. Chia Youyee Vang wasn't surprised the ethnic press ran reviews and announcements of it. Instead, what struck her was how much attention it drew from mainstream broadcast and print media.

She appeared multiple times on general-interest TV and radio shows in the Midwest, for instance, to promote the book, a descriptive history of how the Hmong, including herself as an 8-year-old, arrived in the United States in the 1970s and struggled to adapt to urban life. A bookstore reading in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area featuring Vang attracted such a big crowd that a subsequent one was scheduled.

The warm reception to the book was quite a contrast to how the Hmong used to be treated in this country, says Vang, an assistant professor of history at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She endured racial epithets and taunts daily at her St. Paul elementary school. "The kids were so mean" she recalls. "And when you live in a poor neighborhood, everyone fights over the smallest of resources."

Her family, like thousands of others, fled their homeland of Laos. Many Hmong had secretly aided the U.S. military in its fight against communism in Southeast Asia, and faced persecution after the communists seized power during the Vietnam War and Americans pulled out of Vietnam. …

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