Patterns of Parenting during Adolescence: Perceptions of Adolescents and Parents

By Paulson, Sharon E.; Sputa, Cheryl L. | Adolescence, Summer 1996 | Go to article overview

Patterns of Parenting during Adolescence: Perceptions of Adolescents and Parents


Paulson, Sharon E., Sputa, Cheryl L., Adolescence


Many studies of parenting during adolescence have examined the relations between parenting characteristics (e.g., parenting style and parental involvement) and adolescent outcomes (e.g., school achievement), but few studies have described the actual patterns of parenting during adolescence. The purposes of this study were (1) to explore differences in maternal and paternal parenting style and parental involvement, (2) to examine the differences between parents' and adolescents' perceptions of parenting style and parental involvement, and (3) to explore the changes in parenting style and parental involvement between the adolescents' ninth and twelfth grade years.

Review of Literature

Parenting style usually is conceptualized along two dimensions: parental demandingness (control) and parental responsiveness (warmth), which can be combined to create four categories of parenting - authoritative (high demandingness and high responsiveness), authoritarian (high demandingness and low responsiveness), indulgent or permissive (low demandingness and high responsiveness), and indifferent or neglecting (low demandingness and low responsiveness) (Baumrind, 1971; Maccoby & Martin, 1983). Research has shown that authoritative parenting is more related to higher levels of adjustment (Steinberg, Mounts, Lamborn, & Dornbusch, 1991), psychosocial maturity (Steinberg, Elmen, & Mounts, 1989), psychosocial competence (Lamborn, Mounts, Steinberg, & Dornbusch, 1991), self-esteem (Bartle, Anderson, & Sabatelli, 1989; Johnson, Shulman, & Collins, 1991), and academic success (Dornbusch, Ritter, Leiderman, Roberts, & Fraleigh, 1987; Steinberg et al., 1989) than are other parenting styles. Studies which examined the dimensions of parenting separately similarly found positive relations of both acceptance (responsiveness) and control (demandingness) with psychosocial maturity (Steinberg et al., 1989), school achievement (Paulson, 1994; Steinberg et al., 1989), and self-esteem (Bartle et al., 1989; Parish & McCluskey, 1992; Paulson, Hill, & Holmbeck, 1991). Parental involvement also is considered an important aspect of parenting, especially in relation to children's academic achievement (see Hess & Holloway, 1984 for a review). Three dimensions of parental involvement are found to be related positively to achievement outcomes; namely parental values and expectations (Gottfried & Gottfried, 1989; Paulson, 1994; Steinberg, Lamborn, Dornbusch, & Darling, 1992; Yee & Eccles, 1988), interest in grades and helping with homework (Paulson, 1994; Steinberg et al., 1992), and involvement in school functions (Paulson, 1994; Steinberg et al., 1992; Stevenson & Baker, 1987).

Despite the excellence of these research endeavors, most of these studies on the effects of parenting style and parental involvement on adolescent outcomes have one or more of three major limitations. First, differences between mothers' and fathers' parenting were not considered in many of the studies, although research has reported differences in adolescents' perceptions of their mothers and fathers and in the influences of mothers' and fathers' parenting practices on adolescent outcomes. For example, adolescents tend to link more emotional attributes to mothers and more rigid and formal attributes to fathers; Pipp, Shaver, Jennings, Lamborn, and Fischer (1985) and Youniss and Smollar (1985) found that adolescents' perceived their fathers to be authority figures who provided advice on practical matters and guidelines for behavior, whereas they perceived their mothers to be a combination of authority and equality, intimacy, and conflict. Less is known about maternal and paternal differences in parental involvement.

Second, many of the parenting studies during adolescence considered only adolescents' perceptions of parenting, although research has reported that adolescents' and parents' perceptions of family characteristics may be very different and may predict adolescent outcomes differently. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Patterns of Parenting during Adolescence: Perceptions of Adolescents and Parents
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.