Revolving Doors

By Silverstein, Ken | Multinational Monitor, May 1996 | Go to article overview

Revolving Doors


Silverstein, Ken, Multinational Monitor


In his now-famous diary, former Senator Bob Packwood not only wrote of his sexual antics and back room deals, but also confided his fondest hopes for the future. "I can become a lobbyist at five or six hundred thousand [per year]," read one dreamy entry.

Packwood got his wish, though perhaps sooner than he expected. Following his expulsion from the Senate, he signed on with Preston Gates Ellis & Rouvelas Meeds, whose clients include Microsoft, Asarco and Hewlett-Packard. In addition to Packwood, Preston Gates also employs two former House of Representative members, William Lipinski, a Democrat from Illinois, and Roger Wicker, a Republican from Kentucky, as well as a number of former congressional staffers.

A review of filings under new federal lobbying disclosure laws reveals that for members of Congress, staffers and high-ranking federal employees, public service is often merely a midway stop on the journey to a more lucrative career as beltway influence peddler. They come to Washington, D.C., punch their ticket, and quickly sell themselves to law firms based on their expertise in negotiating the federal bureaucracy. About half of the congressional staffers who worked on the tax reform bill of 1986 went on to become corporate lobbyists.

Packwood is one of 9,219 lobbyists who registered under disclosure rules that went into effect last January. That's twice the number who had previously registered, but still a fraction of the estimated 80,000 hired guns working in the capital.

Several of Packwood's old colleagues have also parlayed dishonorable years in the U.S. capital into profitable lobbying careers. Dave Durenberger, the senator from Minnesota who retired a few years ago under a cloud of scandal, specialized in health care issues during his 16 years in the upper chamber. He now works for APCO Associates, a beltway consulting firm that specializes in stirring up fake "grass-roots" campaigns for its corporate clientele [see "APCO: Astroturf Makers," Multinational Monitor, March 1996]. Durenberger's clients at APCO include Allina Health System, St. Jude Medical (of St. Paul, Minnesota), and several other health care interests.

Working with Durenberger at APCO is Susan Bartlett Foote, his former senior legislative assistant. Foote, who Durenberger married last year, also represents several health care companies. Two other former Durenberger staffers, Matt Dolan and JoAnn Willis, also found employ at beltway lobby shops - Baker and Hostetler, and Patton Boggs, respectively. Given all this, it's easy to see why Durenberger voted against a bill to reform lobbying laws back in 1994.

Dennis DeConcini, a member of the S&L scandal's Keating Five gang, chaired a Senate committee that oversaw drug patents until retiring last year. He swiftly moved to Parry & Romani Associates, a firm run by his former chief of staff, Romano Romani.

At his new home, DeConcini represents pharmaceutical makers like Pfizer, Genetech, Upjohn and Glaxo-Wellcome, the world's largest drug company. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Revolving Doors
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.