Assembly 'Could Spoil Countryside with Wind Turbines for No Purpose' 'Other Green Measures and Energy Efficiency More Useful' COUNTRY & FARMING

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), September 9, 2008 | Go to article overview

Assembly 'Could Spoil Countryside with Wind Turbines for No Purpose' 'Other Green Measures and Energy Efficiency More Useful' COUNTRY & FARMING


Byline: Steve Dube Farming Editor

A GOVERNMENT "in a muddle" over its energy policy has been accused of allowing developers to make a fortune out of ruining the countryside.

Ivor Russell, secretary of the Carmarthenshire branch of the Campaign for the Protection of Rural Wales, said the Welsh Assembly Government was in danger of making matters worse and destroying the countryside for no real purpose.

"What will our children make of it if they look back in a desert of useless wind turbines that have been made redundant by other major factors like nuclear power?" said Mr Russell in an address to the branch's annual meeting in Llanarthne on Saturday.

He recalled that the branch had submitted a detailed response to the WAG consultation on the issue two years ago calling for a two-tiered approach of passive and active measures to reduceCO2 emissions.

The passive measures, including insulating all buildings, using only long-life light bulbs, increased energy efficiency and reducing demand carried no risk but were being widely ignored. And on active measures - wind, wave, tidal, hydro and solar power - the Government was concentrating almost exclusively on wind.

Mr Russell warned that huge tracts of the Welsh landscape could become an industrial powerhouse with massive turbines and hundreds of miles of new pylons and wires across the countryside.

"All the wind turbines built in the world have together made only a very small diminution in the amount of CO2 emissions," he said. "And there's only any point in doing it if the major polluters - the United States, China and India - reduce their emissions.

"The turbines are getting higher all the time, along with the effects on people's lives through noise and the loss of all the other amenity issues which have been ignored so far by a Welsh Assembly Government that is failing to conform to the European Landscape Convention."

The move towards reopening coal mines and building biomass power stations also came under criticism. Robin Cammish, from the Coed Bach action group, near Kidwelly, spoke on plans to build a 50MW biomass power station, even though biomass power generation produces as much CO2 as coal. With a similar one planned for Swansea Docks the fuel would have to be imported 6,000 miles from Alaska as there is insufficient timber in Wales - yet the local authority was recommending approval.

"When you think ofa10-storeyhigh power station in the middle of the countryside you would have thought the council would have been a bit more critical of it," said Mr Cammish. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Assembly 'Could Spoil Countryside with Wind Turbines for No Purpose' 'Other Green Measures and Energy Efficiency More Useful' COUNTRY & FARMING
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.