In the Spotlight

By Felix, Kathie | Multimedia & Internet@Schools, September-October 2008 | Go to article overview

In the Spotlight


Felix, Kathie, Multimedia & Internet@Schools


THE PRODUCT

ISTE Classroom Observation Tool (ICOT)

THE COMPANY

The International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE)

180 W. 8th Ave., Suite 300

Eugene, OR 97401

Phone: (800) 336-5191

Internet: www.iste.org

The ISTE Classroom Observation Tool (ICOT) is a free online resource created to help guide teachers, administrators, and other educators as they observe and assess technology integration in classrooms.

ICOT provides a set of questions designed to aid the classroom observation of a number of key components of technology integration. The tool can be used to collect observations to study school programs or curriculum interventions, document the effective use of technology in schools, and share information.

A free registration is required. Registered users can store ICOT data in a secure account on the ISTE server. Multiple observations can be stored and combined in various ways (program, site, observer, classroom, and more) to generate reports. Users can request a variety of analytical reports based on their observations and data that can be downloaded into other programs for statistical analysis and creating tables and graphs. The online ICOT resources include tutorial videos and a downloadable user's manual.

Classroom observations can be done in classrooms in real time or by using a video archive of lessons such as those at Videoclassroom. …

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