Simpler Frailty Assessment Recommended for Nursing Homes

By Brunk, Doug | Clinical Psychiatry News, August 2008 | Go to article overview

Simpler Frailty Assessment Recommended for Nursing Homes


Brunk, Doug, Clinical Psychiatry News


SALT LAKE CITY -- Diagnosing frailty in a nursing home resident can be a time-consuming undertaking.

According to Dr. John E. Morley, a generally accepted definition of frailty is useful but not practical for most nursing homes because they don't have the time or the staff to test for the criteria that constitute that definition.

"Unless someone's reimbursing you, you probably don't have the time to do this in your practice," Dr. Morley said at the annual symposium of the American Medical Directors Association.

Dr. Morley, a professor of gerontology at St. Louis University, was referring to the criteria set forth by Dr. Linda P. Fried of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions and her associates in 2001. They characterized frailty in older adults as a clinical syndrome occurring when three or more of the following criteria are present: unintentional loss of at least 10 pounds in the past year, self-report of exhaustion, extremely weak grip strength, slow walking speed over 15 feet, and low physical activity as measured by calories expended per week (J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci.2001;56:M146-57).

Instead, Dr. Morley suggested a frailty screening tool developed by the International Academy of Nutrition and Aging, based on simpler answers to questions suggested by the mnemonic FRAIL. F stands for fatigue (Is the person fatigued?); R for resistance (Can the person walk up at least one flight of stairs?); A for aerobic (Can the person walk at least one block?); I for illness (Does the person have more than five illnesses?); and L for loss of weight (Has the person lost more than 5% of his or her weight in the past year?) (J. Am. Med. Dir. Assoc. 2008;9:71-2).

"If you want to measure for frailty quickly in the nursing home setting, this is a nice way to do it," said Dr. Morley, who is editor in chief of the Journal of the American Medical Directors Association. He noted that validation studies of the screening tool are currently underway. He said it's already clear that the tool "is far more useful than an echocardiogram" in revealing frailty. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Simpler Frailty Assessment Recommended for Nursing Homes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.