Engaging Iran

By Sick, Gary | Harvard International Review, Summer 2008 | Go to article overview

Engaging Iran


Sick, Gary, Harvard International Review


Senator Chuck Hagel ("At a Dangerous Crossroads," Spring 2008) is a rare and heartening voice of radical moderation in American national politics. His perspective is crucial at this time of shrill hyperboles toward Iran that threatens to lock all presidential candidates into a self-defeating cycle of threats and coercion that has already been tried and found wanting.

Regrettably, the kind of bargain that Iran would have found extremely hard to resist in the previous two decades is no longer available. The price keeps getting higher, and we constantly find ourselves behind the curve. Perhaps for that reason, the concept of engagement with Iran has gained currency. What is often unclear is exactly what would be on the table. Let me offer a few practical suggestions.

Sir John Thomson and his colleagues at MIT have been working on the concept of a multinational enrichment facility to be located in Iran, as a way to respond to Iran's determination to have a fuel source on its own soil while keeping the process transparent and out of Iranian hands exclusively. More recently, a version of this idea has been given greater visibility by former ambassadors William Luers and Thomas Pickering in the New York Review of Books. The great appeal of this approach is that the Iranians have already signed on in principle. It does not eliminate all enrichment capacity from Iranian soil, but in reality that point was passed years ago and, in my view, is no longer a realistic goal.

In considering a negotiating agenda with the Iranians, it is worth remembering the terms of the Iranian 2003 offer to the United States that was ignored. Although that was not an agreement or a firm offer, it did spell out the nature of arrangements that Iran would be willing to consider in a final agreement. Iran acknowledged its understanding of the rather high bar of transparency that the United States would require on WMD and recognized that it would have to address a number of other difficult issues. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Engaging Iran
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.