The Road to Unity: Tenuous Progress in Cyprus

By Galster, Collin | Harvard International Review, Summer 2008 | Go to article overview

The Road to Unity: Tenuous Progress in Cyprus


Galster, Collin, Harvard International Review


Hope for a different approach to reconciliation in Cyprus has brought new leadership to the long-divided Mediterranean island nation. Communist president Dimitris Christofias opened historic Ledra Street in the capital, Nicosia, in accordance with his campaign promises. Amid much fanfare, Cypriots crossed the "Green Line," the north-south barrier that symbolizes the national divide, for the first time in decades. The recent progress has been encouraging but not without stumbles. Ledra Street, for example, closed again on the very day of its opening, when Turkish troops mistakenly entered the UN buffer zone. Cyprus' fragile advances suggest that even though Cypriots now have the moderate leadership they have long sought, unity is far from guaranteed. Reunification in Cyprus will likely hinge on the most difficult of roadblocks--Turkish compliance.

Voters elected Christofias wanting to change the approach to the reconciliation process in Cyprus, where the Greek-controlled south has been divided from the Turkish-controlled north since 1974. Much of Christofias' wide-ranging support has hinged on his commitment to reuniting the island. He won the election on a moderate, pro-market platform--a stark contrast to his predecessor's obstructionism. His pro-unification stance attracted nearly 54 percent of Cypriots in the election, giving Christofias both a wide margin of victory and a mandate to follow through on his diplomatic promises.

The current situation seems to augur well for a political settlement. Most importantly, both governments are now led by moderate presidents. Christofias' northern counterpart, Mehmet Ali Talat, also defeated an obstructionist predecessor. The leaders have thawed a two-year diplomatic freeze in which little more than hardline rhetoric was exchanged between the two governments. The duo's resolve has generated several tangible successes that would have been difficult to imagine even a few years ago, including the high-level diplomatic talks that led to a joint opening of Ledra Street. They have acted on promises to convene nearly 100 experts to iron out details of reunification. The leaders have also publicly displayed goodwill measures, such as Talat's walk through shops in the Greek half of Nicosia's market. These efforts have been concrete enough to elicit high-level attention from the United Nations, the United States, Britain, and others.

But the current optimism belies the tenuous nature of Cyprus' progress. After the Turkish troops' mishap marred the opening of Ledra Street, Christofias sparked further diplomatic controversy by suggesting that his counterpart was unaccountable and not truly in control. However, obstacles larger than rhetoric further obstruct a settlement, however. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Road to Unity: Tenuous Progress in Cyprus
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.