Digital Photographer Moves Panoramas into the Great Indoors

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), September 18, 2008 | Go to article overview

Digital Photographer Moves Panoramas into the Great Indoors


Byline: Bob Keefer The Register-Guard

The humble workplaces of the Eugene art world are bent, folded and miraculously transformed in a collection of large panoramic photographs Dennis Galloway is showing this month and next at the Eugene Public Library.

Galloway, a career professional photographer who moved here from the San Francisco Bay Area last year, visited more than a dozen local artists (and one gallery owner) in their studios, bringing along an inexpensive digital pocket camera, a home-rigged panoramic head and his journeyman's sense of what makes a compelling image.

And these photographs are absolutely compelling.

First off, they're printed brilliantly by Eugene printer Janet Smith, who has a keen sense of how to make a color digital photograph look like an actual photograph (she doesn't try to disguise them as watercolors, say) without the harsh, artificial, hyper-saturated and oversharpened look kicked out by so many desktop computer printers these days.

In fact, it's safe to say she's figured out how to make photographs beautiful again.

But then there are the photographs themselves. Stitched together electronically from half a dozen or more digital images each, they explode with a level of detail that's positively voyeuristic.

In art book maker Sandy Tilcock's studio, for example, you can clearly read the hands on her watch: It's 6:10 p.m. as the photo is being taken (probably not 6:10 a.m.). Meanwhile, her big black dog is caught in a moment of lying down nearby among a countless welter of bits and pieces of an artistic life.

Painter Kathleen Caprario's home studio is filled with books, and you can read the titles. It will come as no surprise to anyone who knows her work that a lot of them are about Byzantine art.

A viewer can get quickly and happily lost in these bits of yarn, piles of wood shavings, tubes of paint, half-opened drawers and unfinished musical instruments (Galloway knows a lot of luthiers) that clutter these photographs. …

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