The World Needs Order in the Russian Military. for without It the Most Vicious Dogs of War Will Be Let Loose upon an Already Unstable Society, with Disastrous Consequences

By Lloyd, John | New Statesman (1996), August 9, 1996 | Go to article overview

The World Needs Order in the Russian Military. for without It the Most Vicious Dogs of War Will Be Let Loose upon an Already Unstable Society, with Disastrous Consequences


Lloyd, John, New Statesman (1996)


The armed horde that is now the Russian military is one of the future terrors of the world. We hold a very large stake in its future control. General Alexander Lebed could be a saviour in this. He did not win the presidency he strove for in June, but he may do as important a job in a lesser capacity.

Lebed's pitch was order and discipline. Since being brought into the administration he has continued to press the case for urgent overhaul of the armed forces. The appointment of General Igor Rodionov as defence minister to replace the long discredited General Pavel Grachev was taken after Lebed was appointed national security chief, and probably reflected his influence. Rodionov, shifted aside by Grachev to head the General Staff Academy, was seen as a clean officer in an Augean stable of corruption and graft.

The extent of the corruption has never been made clear. But we know something of its scope. We know that the Western Group of armed forces - the military presence in Central and Eastern Europe, was looted by its senior officers from 1990 onwards, as it withdrew from the Warsaw Pact bases. Military hardware, from MiG 29 fighters to Kalashnikov rifles, was on sale; contracts were signed with suppliers who doubled their charges and split the difference of the excess with the Russian commanders.

In 1994 a young journalist named Dmitri Kholodov began running a series of articles in his newspaper, the Moskovsky Komsomolets, about the corruption. He was killed with a suitcase bomb. Soon afterwards the deputy defence minister General Matvei Burlakov, who had headed the Western Group, was relieved of duty for unspecified reasons.

In Russia itself the feeding was just as frenzied. Senior officers had dachas built for them, using army material and conscript labour. Weapons were sold freely, especially in the Caucasus. The still-substantial state funds allocated to the military are leeched away for private consumption. Recent allegations by General Lev Rokhlin, a member of the state duma (parliament) point a finger at three generals who have embezzled $30m.

The conscripts in this army are a mixture of victims and predators. The draft has fallen as low as ten per cent of the target. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The World Needs Order in the Russian Military. for without It the Most Vicious Dogs of War Will Be Let Loose upon an Already Unstable Society, with Disastrous Consequences
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.