Name That Teuton ... Stars of Cabaret Joel Grey and Liza Minnelli. Inset: Oliver Collignon in the Chlling Scene Featuring the Song Tomorrow Belongs to Me

Daily Mail (London), October 1, 2008 | Go to article overview

Name That Teuton ... Stars of Cabaret Joel Grey and Liza Minnelli. Inset: Oliver Collignon in the Chlling Scene Featuring the Song Tomorrow Belongs to Me


Byline: Charles Legge

QUESTION

Did the boy who sang the chilling Tomorrow Belongs To Me in the 1972 film version of Cabaret go on to have a musical career?

THIS song was introduced in the stage version of Kander and Ebb's musical Cabaret, and sung at the engagement party of Herr Schultz and Frau Schneider at the end of act one. It starts as a gentle song, but by the end, when most of the guests have joined in, it becomes a song of Nazi patriotism.

It was used in a similar context in the film version, being sung in a beer garden by an angelic-looking youth who, as the camera pans backs is seen to belong to Hitler Youth. He is joined in song by most of the other customers in the garden a chilling moment in this very serious musical.

The youth was played in the film by German actor Oliver Collignon, and little is known about him except that he appeared in a few other German films of the early Seventies.

As so often in film musicals, the actor's voice didn't match his physical appearance and the song was dubbed by American actor Mark Lambert, who appeared on Broadway in 1973 in A Little Night Music, Hugh Wheeler and Stephen Sondheim's musical adaptation of Ingmar Bergman's comedy Smiles Of A Summer Night.

He played the theology student who fell in love with his young stepmother, played by Victoria Lambert, Mark's real-life wife.

Mark is now a management consultant.

Peter Ferguson, London N1.

QUESTION

How many soldiers took part in the Charge Of The Light Brigade and who were they? T

THE rolls of the regiments that formed the Light Brigade and took part in the charge are preserved in detail and can be examined at the Public Record Office at Kew.

A total of 666 riders formed up for the charge. About 1,000 were on the rolls on October 25, 1854, but many were sick, injured or assigned to other duties, and no precise roll was taken just before the charge. But there are precise records of those who were killed, wounded or taken prisoner.

Others known to have charged were subsequently admitted to the Balaklava Commemoration Society, or identified from letters or accounts written by men known to have charged.

These various sources provide a comprehensive, though possibly still incomplete, list of these who rode 'into the valley of death'.

Much information has been publicised over the subsequent 154 years and is easily accessible. An excellent account was published in 2004 by Penguin Books, titled Hell Riders by Terry Brighton.

I have my own memento of the charge, as I have inherited the silver pocket watch carried by a distant relative, a trooper in the 11th Hussars. The other regiments were the 4th and 13th Light Dragoons, the 6th Dragoons, 8th Hussars and 17th Lancers.

Through regimental mergers, none of these regiments still exists under their 1854 titles.

The 17th Lancers have now become the Queen's Royal Lancers. Their museum is at Lancer House, Prince William of Gloucester Barracks, Grantham NG31 7TJ. The 11th Hussars are now the King's Royal Hussars and their museum is at Peninsula Barracks, Romsey Road, Winchester SO23 8TS.

The 13th Light Dragoons are now part of the The Light Dragoons and this regiment has two museums, one at Cannon Hall Museum, Cawthorne, Barnsley, and the other at The Newcastle Discovery, Newcastle Upon Tyne.

The 4th Light Dragoons and 8th Hussars are now part of the Queen's Royal Hussars, and their museums are at Lord Leyster Hospital, High Street, Warwick, CV34 4BH and The Redoubt Fortress, Royal Parade, Eastbourne, BN22 7AQ. An alphabetical list of known names of the soldiers who took part can be found on the website www.chargeofthelightbrigade.com Tony James, Southwick, West Sussex.

QUESTION

Is it true that in the event of an ATM robbery you can alert the police by entering your pin into the ATM in reverse? …

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