How Law Students and Attorneys Can Help the Pro-Life Movement

By Pavone, Frank | Ave Maria Law Review, Summer 2007 | Go to article overview

How Law Students and Attorneys Can Help the Pro-Life Movement


Pavone, Frank, Ave Maria Law Review


I. THE PRIORITY OF THE TASK

At their annual meeting in November of 1989, the United States Catholic Bishops unanimously adopted a Resolution on Abortion, which stated in part: "At this particular time, abortion has become the fundamental human rights issue for all men and women of good will." (1) That statement remains true today and has been echoed in numerous subsequent statements from the bishops over the years. No act of violence claims more victims. (2) Moreover, no social policy more radically undermines our legal system, turning on its head the very purpose of law. In their 1998 document Living the Gospel of Life, the bishops made this striking statement: "When American political life becomes an experiment on people rather than for and by them, it will no longer be worth conducting. We are arguably moving closer to that day." (3)

Pope John Paul II spoke in similarly strong language about the implications of the failure of the state to protect the right to life in his encyclical The Gospel of Life, which is a seminal document for the pro-life movement:

   The appearance of the strictest respect for legality is maintained,
   at least when the laws permitting abortion and euthanasia are the
   result of a ballot in accordance with what are generally seen as
   the rules of democracy. Really, what we have here is only the
   tragic caricature of legality; the democratic ideal, which is only
   truly such when it acknowledges and safeguards the dignity of every
   human person, is betrayed in its very foundations.... When this
   happens, the process leading to the breakdown of a genuinely human
   coexistence and the disintegration of the state itself has already
   begun.

   ... This is the death of true freedom.... (4)

There can be no arena, therefore, in which the assistance of professionals--and in no small measure, legal professionals--is more urgently needed than in the pro-life movement. What is at stake is not merely a societal trend or an undesirable policy, but ultimately the survival of society.

II. THE SPECIAL CONTRIBUTION OF LEGAL PROFESSIONALS

The abortion issue, and therefore the pro-life movement, has many dimensions, and there are many professional organizations geared toward assisting people to use their professional skills to advance the culture of life. (5) Whether as a member of such organizations or not, and whether doing pro-life work full-time or part-time, legal professionals are needed to meet many critical strategic and practical needs of the pro-life movement at the present time. Meeting these needs corresponds to the call of Pope John Paul II to transform culture with the help of law. (6) This Article identifies eight of these areas: (1) assisting citizens to understand the nature of our government, and particularly the rote of the judiciary; (2) assisting pro-lifers to understand and utilize their First Amendment right to freedom of speech; (3) exposing abortionists and their staff to the consequences of malpractice and other illegal activity in abortion clinics; (4) assisting women who have been injured physically and emotionally from abortion; (5) gathering evidence from legal documents for pro-life activists to use; (6) assisting pastors and other Church leaders to understand and exercise their rights regarding political activity; (7) assisting pro-life organizations to create and strengthen their legal infrastructure; and (8) developing the "embryonic moment" in constitutional law.

A. Understanding Our Republic and Our Judiciary

Americans have never agreed with the current policy of abortion-on-demand, and most still do not understand what that policy is. Yet as people become informed about it and desire to change it, a basic understanding about how our Republic is structured and how the three branches of government interact is indispensable. Law students and attorneys exercise special influence here, because they can speak with a certain authority. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

How Law Students and Attorneys Can Help the Pro-Life Movement
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.