Rome OKs History Project on Women Religious

By Wirpa, Leslie | National Catholic Reporter, August 9, 1996 | Go to article overview

Rome OKs History Project on Women Religious


Wirpa, Leslie, National Catholic Reporter


Two years after regaining a measure of autonomy from strict Vatican control, CLAR, the Latin American Conference of Religious, has circumvented a new confrontation with Rome concerning a groundbreaking project on women religious.

In April, Archbishop Francisco Javier Errazuriz Ossa, secretary of the Congregation for Institutes of Consecrated Life and for Societies of Apostolic Life, halted progress of CLAR's "Recuperation of the Historical Memory of Women's Religious Life in Latin America."

This four-year initiative, according to CLAR President Elza Ribeiro, a Brazilian Sister of Providence, aims to help Latin American women religious "step out of anonymity and be recognized for their dignity and the role they play in church and society."

The project will document a 40-year history of women religious in Latin America by compiling historical records from religious communities, testimonies from women, surveys, written reflections and theological analysis. The group hopes to have the project completed by 1999, CLAR's 40th anniversary.

"It will not be written by historians but by women religious themselves, reflecting their perceptions, their form of critical analysis, their perspectives. We will tell our own stories," Ribeiro said, adding that CLAR will invite some male theologians to participate in the theological analysis.

The project was paralyzed in April, however, when Errazuriz impeded the distribution of a survey to 25 conferences of women religious after he received news of a controversial January 31 letter criticizing CLAR's actions. The letter was signed by Consuela Fernandez and was written on letterhead bearing the name of the Daughters of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary, a Colombian order. Copies of the letter reached some 30 cardinals and dozens of superior generals in Rome, CLAR Secretary-General Fr. Pedro Acevedo told NCR in a telephone interview from the organization's headquarters in Bogota, Colombia.

The letter, of which NCR obtained a copy, claims some religious "want to ruin traditional religious life" in Latin America in the same way others ruined it in the United States. It asks that CLAR's project be "urgently" stopped to "avoid this tragedy."

The letter blames Jesuit priests for introducing religious women to "radical, unsubmissive and rebellious feminism." A second letter from Fernandez to women superior generals, dated March 19, warns of the negative influence of Dominican, Jesuit, Claritian and Redemptorist priests.

Errazuriz requested further information about the project and summoned CLAR officials to discussions in Rome.

On April 16, CLAR received a letter from the superior general of the Daughters of the Sacred Hearts saying Fernandez was not a member of the congregation and that the letterhead did not bear the community's official stamp. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Rome OKs History Project on Women Religious
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.