Collaboration Works for At-Risk and Delinquent Youths

By Wolford, Bruce; McGee, Tami et al. | Corrections Today, August 1996 | Go to article overview

Collaboration Works for At-Risk and Delinquent Youths


Wolford, Bruce, McGee, Tami, Raque, Teri, Coffey, Osa D., Corrections Today


The challenges of providing at-risk and delinquent youths with a quality education are complex. The solutions usually are difficult to find, especially since these children are the responsibility of several agencies and jurisdictions. The Commonwealth of Kentucky has embarked on a pioneering effort to enhance educational services for these youths. The effort grew out of the 1990 Kentucky Educational Reform Act (KERA) which sought to bring sweeping reforms to all aspects of elementary and secondary education in the state. In 1992, the General Assembly passed additional legislation to ensure that the KERA reforms also would reach the at-risk and delinquent children in day treatment or residential programs operated or contracted for by the Cabinet for Human Resources. These "state agency children" (SAC) became the target for a new state collaborative - the Kentucky Educational Collaborative for State Agency Children (KECSAC).

Partnership Forms

KECSAC, as the name indicates, is a collaborative effort which currently involves more than 100 public and private youth treatment programs, 55 local school districts, the state Departments of Education, Social Services, Juvenile Justice and Mental Health/Mental Retardation. The Collaborative is managed by the Training Resource Center at Eastern Kentucky University under a contract with the Cabinet for Families and Children. The university's responsibilities as the KECSAC manager include: to foster and maintain collaboration among the partners; to promote school district and program cooperation between education and treatment; to administer the State Agency Children's Fund, which provides supplemental state funding for school districts for the education of youth in residential and day treatment programs; to provide professional development opportunities for educators; and to collect, analyze and disseminate information regarding state agency children, their educational needs and opportunities and outcomes.

An external evaluator, whose responsibilities include both process and outcome evaluation, monitors the Collaborative's efforts. The evaluator has given KECSAC and the Commonwealth valuable insights into the educational needs and services available for the state's most troubled youths.

Children Served

The youths served by KECSAC are defined as follows: "Those children of school age committed to or in the custody of the Cabinet for Human Resources' operated or contracted institution, facility or day treatment program, or placed or financed through the Cabinet of Human Resources in a private facility pursuant to child care agreements other than those for foster care; and those children of school age in home and community-based services provided as an alternative to intermediate care facility services for mentally retarded."

Programs Served by KECSAC

                                                    Number of State
Program Settings                                    Agency Children

Division of Youth Services residential programs           771

Division of Youth Services day treatment programs         725

Private residential treatment programs:                  1553

community mental health centers                            30
group homes                                                84
independent living programs                                84
intermediate care facilities                               63
psychiatric hospitals                                     450
psychiatric residential treatment facilities               53
temporary shelters                                        226
youth treatment programs                                  563

More than 3,000 youths, ranging in age from 4 to 21, in public and private (profit and nonprofit) youth treatment programs are served by KECSAC on any given day.

Program Achieves Goals

Since the inception of KECSAC in 1992, there have been dramatic increases in both services and resources available for the education of state agency children, while the number of children served has grown from 1,000 to 3,000. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Collaboration Works for At-Risk and Delinquent Youths
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.