Little Night Songs

By Stewart, Susan | TriQuarterly, Spring 1996 | Go to article overview

Little Night Songs


Stewart, Susan, TriQuarterly


Oleander, pennywort a fillip in the wind breath blows ash across the sill comes from the tarnished cup

Hobo trills his acid flute opossum snouts the leaves oak-dry, gold-lit motes fly up and up, now spark, now out

Shrew-run, shrew-struck owl and gem-eyed beetle glitter curls between the teeth nails scrape furrowed bark

Where the wind lays down her head sirens swell the sound the willow's wands are woven up and back through liquid limbs

Gate locked, turnstile stopped shuttered, curtained, blind the cut-worm, slug, and aphid soon shred the petalled stem

Bonfire or barnfire accident or not pain's a form of telescope for watchers on the hill

Instruments of interval calibrated space physician's glove inside the chest a cave of mineral cold

Pacing waiter, pacing, waits Patrons loiter, linger fingering the button bank where star-lit codes will flicker

Love's not love in video charmed beasts go extinct song's not song unless it's stung with static, scat, and ink

Night sweats, nicotine and sweet syringe, rehearsal, fear cheap life, cheaper now than ever leaping on a dare

Nicotiana, honey-bloomer, trumpeting awaft satin-edged and rustling in fluorescent milky light

Gunman scratches itching palm drinker staggers glass brown bag sheaths the sorry lip headlights pass and pass

Raisins, almonds, little lambs, fox has gone-a-hunting butterflies pecking eyes - sleep before the haunting

Carrousels of janitors - door revolving still - grab the ring when you come round take the cord and pull

Melancholy Saturn, sad- sack St. …

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Little Night Songs
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