News Analysis: Politics of the COI

Marketing, October 8, 2008 | Go to article overview

News Analysis: Politics of the COI


The Tories' pledge to cut the COI's spend raises questions about the value of its work.

Complaints about the COI's funding levels make for easy headlines, but the fuss usually dies down as the political agenda moves on to something more substantial. However, at last week's Conservative Party conference the future funding and role of the organisation was in question as shadow chancellor George Osborne vowed to cut government adspend to offset a freeze on council tax.

Osborne used Nielsen data to point out that only Procter & Gamble spends more on all forms of advertising than the COI, and proposed to reduce spend to levels similar to those of 1997 by capping government ad budgets that do not apply to the NHS, schools and the police, if the Conservatives should come to power.

Such proclamations are key to Conservative leader David Cameron's grand goal - also announced at last week's conference - to impose 'discipline on government spending'. These types of promises are often quickly forgotten, but given the unpopularity of the current administration and the strong likelihood that the Tories would win an overwhelming majority in a snap general election, they should be considered with some seriousness.

Mark Wallace, campaigns director at the Taxpayers' Alliance, believes Osborne's proposals do not go far enough. 'Do we really want Whitehall spending tens of millions on planning and running ad campaigns, rather than on schools, hospitals and the criminal justice system?' he asks. 'We have a health service turning people away, while the government is spending money on making moral judgments about how people should live their lives.'

Rory Sutherland, vice-chairman of Ogilvy group, disagrees. 'Reducing spend on government advertising may be the right thing to do where it isn't working, or serves an agenda that the new government does not wish to pursue, but to make a blanket pronouncement against the use of advertising is silly,' he says. 'Which is better? Hiring more doctors and firemen, or encouraging people not to get ill or start fires? A lot of evidence suggests the latter can be a better use of money.'

However, it is not only fringe political pressure groups that are prepared to add their weight to the argument that government spending needs reining in - the Liberal Democrats also offer some cross-party support. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

News Analysis: Politics of the COI
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.