Searching for Semantic Web Services-A Google Based Approach

By Arroyo, Sinuhe; Sung-Kook, Han et al. | Journal of Digital Information Management, September 2005 | Go to article overview

Searching for Semantic Web Services-A Google Based Approach


Arroyo, Sinuhe, Sung-Kook, Han, Fensel, Dieter, Journal of Digital Information Management


Abstract: Semantic Web Service discovery and selection are a very time and resources consuming task. They require reasoning support for the matchmaking of the capabilities of services against user defined goals and constituent sub-goals, and for the mediation of the domain knowledge used to describe the different relevant aspects of services. This paper presents a performance study around the number of times the reasoner has to be used in nowadays initiatives. Such study lays the basis for an innovative approach inspired in the popular search engine Google, which tries to improve the performance of the whole process. The main idea is to carry the reasoning as an off-line task, storing the output for later reuse. It also elaborates on the idea of making service descriptions and goals available independently of registries or repositories, i.e. Web pages. Such idea permits to profit, extend and further reuse, well established concepts developed by popular search engines, thus assimilating service discovery and selection to any other type of search engine task.

Categories and Subject Descriptors

H.3 [Information Storage and Retrieval]; H.3.3 [Information Search and Retrieval]: Search Process; H.3.5 [Online Information Services]: Web Based Services

General Terms

Semantic Web, Search Engines, Google

Keywords: Semantic Web Services, WSMO, Google, Search engines.

1. Introduction

The combination of Semantic Web Technology and Web Services has been termed Semantic Web Services. Semantic Web Services count with the ability to change the Web into a common platform where agents (organizations, individuals, and software) communicate with each other to carry out various activities. In order to successfully use Semantic Web Services its relevant information needs to be described in a machine understandable and processable way. The semantic markup of services by means of ontologies facilitates the machine-processability and machine-understandability that added on top of Web Services permits to publish, discover, select, mediate, compose, execute, monitor, replace, compensate and audit services, for the benefit of some agent who seeks to fulfill some user-defined task conceptualized as a goal. The set of steps that put together the different relevant aspects for the use of Semantic Web Services has been termed, Semantic Web Service Usage Process. Such process will allow the development and execution of a value added services that will solve increasingly complex tasks by making available for discovery new composed Services. In order to successfully discover services, a detailed description of its relevant information, namely, service capability, interfaces, nonfunctional properties, goals and constituent sub-goals needs to be published. Current approaches to publication are based on services registries that store a partial description of the service, and goal repositories that store goals and constituent sub-goals. Once services are published, the discovery phase tries to match the capabilities of the different available services against the description of the goal that the end user aims to achieve. Finally, during selection and based on the non-functional properties of the service, the most appropriate ones, e.g. the most reliable and cost effective ones, among the discovered services are selected. A common feature to discovery and selection is that a reasoner engine is required in order to match goals and capabilities (discovery), and to mediate among domain specific terminologies (selection and discovery). Essentially the user goal is decomposed into constituent sub-goals which need to be individually matched against the capabilities of registered services, requiring the alignment of the terminology used to describe capabilities and sub-goals. During the selection phase mediation is also required in order to align the different vocabularies used to describe non-functional properties. …

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