Developing a Visual Lexical Model for Semantic Management of Architectural Visual Data Design of Spatial Ontology for Caravanserais of Silk Roads

By Andaroodi, Elham; Andres, Frederic et al. | Journal of Digital Information Management, December 2004 | Go to article overview

Developing a Visual Lexical Model for Semantic Management of Architectural Visual Data Design of Spatial Ontology for Caravanserais of Silk Roads


Andaroodi, Elham, Andres, Frederic, Ono, Kinji, Lebigre, Pierre, Journal of Digital Information Management


Abstract

In this article we discuss issues related to developing a visual model in order to conceptualize and represent lexical knowledge of the historical architecture domain to improve the semantic management of visual information and reduce the ambiguity problem of data access. This model -domain ontology- provides systematic lexical specification of the components and the relationships between them that reflects 3 dimensional characteristics of the architectural content for a typology of historical buildings, caravanserais of the Silk Roads. This paper discusses issues about design and data input of the lexical model, specially the multilingual terminology. Further as the process of defining relationships is the main focus of developing a spatial ontology model, this paper will review the necessary background knowledge and the contribution of architectural domain for collecting and creating relationships in order to cover the attributes of architectural space and the constraints and properties that will influence defining pair of links for the corpus of this research. The initial design of prototype of this model with relationships using protege tool is also presented. Finally we conclude with a technical application of this knowledge model which purposes are to support the semantic of visual architectural information and to enhance data management for the users for internet based access.

Key words: Visual lexical model, spatial ontology, semantic management

1. Introduction

Management of cultural heritage information systems mostly confront with multi disciplinary content of cultural databases. Factors such as history, time, location, space, social behavior, tradition, etc. will provide a wide variety of data and make the process of data gathering and distribution complicated. Therefore developing proper models for each special cultural field in order to conceptualize the content, to specify and represent its technical knowledge seems essential. Such models need to share common understanding of the structure of information and introduce standards to allow data interoperability between different systems and communities, especially over internet.

As a subset of cultural heritage, creating a knowledge model for architectural remains will face the main characteristics of a building, three-dimensional form and spatial organization of components as a whole. This characteristic is mostly reflected in visual data (3 dimensions information such as photos or 3D models) that record a historical building from different angles or views and show its components from different perspectives. Such data based on their specific content contain many technical details of the domain. Fig1 and Fig2 show 2 examples of such databases, different perspectives of main facade of a subset of historical buildings, a caravanserai. For management of such data and mostly annotation of images, technical domain knowledge within a spatial model that is proper for describing an architectural content is needed. We can see that components have different shapes in these 2 photos. There fore such a systematic model needs also to be perspective independent.

Based on the above example, the main challenges ahead for data management of such architectural visual content is to search and create a systematic knowledge model that covers the spatial features of the content. This model needs also to provide advanced information access for the users without any ambiguity regarding the content (e.g. different perspectives and shapes of the components, technical knowledge of details, etc).

This paper presents results from an on-going research (1) focusing on the development of a semantic knowledge model, architectural domain ontology. This model conceptualizes the domain knowledge and presents a lexical visual specification of the architectural content to reflect its spatial characteristics, which means the hierarchical structured term-sets to name components and the relationships between them. …

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