Will Political Concerts Re-Ignite Ethics Debate?

By Strupp, Joe | Editor & Publisher, October 1, 2008 | Go to article overview

Will Political Concerts Re-Ignite Ethics Debate?


Strupp, Joe, Editor & Publisher


So will any reporters pay to get into the Barack Obama benefit concert by Bruce Springsteen and Billy Joel on Oct. 16 in New York -- or any of the other election campaign concerts sure to take place in this month?

And if they do, will they be suspended, fired, or otherwise reprimanded for essentially contributing to the Obama campaign by way of their ticket?

Perhaps. Four years ago, a series of concerts by Springsteen and others that were touted as fundraisers for then-Democratic presidential nominee John Kerry sparked debate over what constitutes conflict of interest and personal activities.

The St. Paul Pioneer Press suspended two reporters in 2004 for attending one of the pro-Kerry "Vote for Change" concerts that raised money for political causes. The move prompted a formal grievance at the time by the Newspaper Guild.

Vicki Gowler, then-editor of the Pioneer Press, had issued a warning memo to staffers not to attend the concerts headlined by Springsteen and others if their beats suggested a potential conflict. Because their assignments spanned such a broad spectrum, Gowler considered the two suspended scribes to be in conflict. "They get involved in covering things that relate to politics and elections," Gowler, now editor of The Idaho Statesman in Boise, said at the time.

In fact, Gowler said then that she had been planning to assign one of the reporters to follow a story surrounding a new computer voting system for Minnesota that involved a Republican Secretary of State.

"I don't know how I would explain to readers if they challenged why one of these reporters was covering a Republican state officeholder on a controversial state issue," Gowler said then. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Will Political Concerts Re-Ignite Ethics Debate?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.