Student Portfolio Web Sites: Valuable Communication Aids to Future Employers

By Lyons, Patrick J. | Review of Business, Spring 2008 | Go to article overview

Student Portfolio Web Sites: Valuable Communication Aids to Future Employers


Lyons, Patrick J., Review of Business


Abstract

A student portfolio Web site can be a valuable communication aid for a student when seeking future employment. This paper presents a straightforward approach on how to develop a student portfolio Web site by modifying a prototype Web site, using only Microsoft Word and the Internet Explorer. The procedure is for the student to copy the prototype Web site to his or her individual PC, modify the template Web pages of the prototype to include his or her personal information, add copies of his/her digital works and then copy the result to an Internet server. Eighteen student portfolio Web sites were created. A sample of the Web sites is presented. All 18 are available on the Internet and may be viewed in their entirety.

Introduction

A student portfolio Web site is a Web site that contains samples of a student's work, such as word processed documents, workbooks, presentations and other types of works. It also contains a few summarizing Web pages that provide easy navigation to the various works. A student portfolio Web site can be a valuable communication aid to potential employers.

Suppose a student submits a resume to apply for a job and then receives a phone call from the company he has contacted. During the conversation, the interviewer may say that the job requires good writing skills. The student may volunteer that he/she has a portfolio Web site which the interviewer may view via the Internet. After providing the Web site's address, the student can lead the interviewer directly to the document in question. They can then have a more meaningful discussion, because the interviewer is looking at the document. If appropriate, the student can direct the interviewer to look at additional workbooks, presentations and/or other works that demonstrate the student's related abilities. In short, the existence of a portfolio Web site increases a student's ability to communicate the value of his or her works. In addition, once the student is invited for an onsite interview with a potential employer, a portfolio Web site can be helpful in one-on-one interviews and presentations to larger groups.

This paper presents an approach for a student to develop a personal portfolio Web site by modifying a prototype Web site, using only Microsoft Word and the Internet Explorer. Specifically, this paper describes the templates available from the prototype, the five step-by-step exercises used in an undergraduate management information systems (MIS) course, links to view the resulting student portfolio Web sites and a brief presentation of some of the resulting student Web sites.

Literature Review

Traditionally, artists have maintained portfolios of their work to show to potential buyers, agents and galleries, as an aid in selling their current art and seeking future work. In a similar fashion, a student portfolio contains work that a student has collected, reflected, selected and presented to demonstrate key skills and accomplishments. A critical component of a student's portfolio is the student's reflection on the individual pieces of work, as well as an overall reflection on the story that the portfolio tells (see Barrett, 2007).

As discussed in Greenberg (2004), it is helpful to classify portfolios in terms of when the work is organized relative to when the work is created. This results in three types of portfolios:

1. Showcase Portfolio: organization occurs after the work has been created.

2. Structured Portfolio: a predefined organization exists for work that is yet to be created.

3. Learning Portfolio; organization of the work evolves as the work is created.

Showcase Portfolio. With so much material in digital form, a common starting point for a student portfolio is a Web site that contains specific examples of work that has already been created. Although student showcase portfolios can be free-form and open, institutions like Pennsylvania State University (2007) find that students need some guidance if the portfolios are to be useful for job interviews and applications to graduate school. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Student Portfolio Web Sites: Valuable Communication Aids to Future Employers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.