Government Ditches 42-Day Detention after Lords Defeat; Humiliating Climbdown after Peers Reject Totemic Bill by 191 Votes

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), October 14, 2008 | Go to article overview

Government Ditches 42-Day Detention after Lords Defeat; Humiliating Climbdown after Peers Reject Totemic Bill by 191 Votes


Byline: Western Mail reporter

THE Government was last night forced into a humiliating climbdown after peers rejected controversial anti-terror laws.

Home Secretary Jacqui Smith withdrew plans for extending pre-charge detention for terror suspects to 42 days in an emergency statement to the House of Commons, after they were defeated in the Lords.

She said a new Bill, which included the measures, was written and ready to be made law if they were needed.

MsSmith attacked opponents of the proposals, saying: "Some may take the security of the British people lightly. I do not."

Ms Smith said she was not prepared to leave the British people unprotected against the terror threat.

She accused critics of "being prepared to ignore the terrorist threat for fear of taking a tough but necessary decision".

Measures in the Counter Terrorism Bill to add two weeks to the pre-charge detention limit were defeated by a crushing 191 votes yesterday, including those of former Labour Lord Chancellors Lord Falconer and Lord Irvine.

With Prime Minister Gordon Brown sitting behind her, Ms Smith said: "I do not believe, as some Hon Members clearly do, that it is enough to simply cross our fingers and hope for the best.

"Mr Speaker, that is not good enough. Because when it comes to national security, there are certain risks I'm not prepared to take.

"I am not prepared to risk leaving the British people without the protections they need."

Ministers will now hope the presentation of the new Bill will give them a degree of political cover as they walk away from what was a major plank of their counter-terror policy.

They were left with little choice but to ditch the plans when faced with the prospect of a bruising return to the Commons.

The measures had squeezed through in June despite more than 30 Labour rebels voting with the Opposition, thanks to the support of Democratic Unionist MPs.

Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg said the move was a "victory for civil liberties" and the new Bill was a "fig leaf".

He said: "The decision to prepare emergency legislation instead is merely a fig leaf which does little to disguise their defeat. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Government Ditches 42-Day Detention after Lords Defeat; Humiliating Climbdown after Peers Reject Totemic Bill by 191 Votes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.