Poetry Ring

By Strate, Lance; Winslow, Dale | ETC.: A Review of General Semantics, July 2008 | Go to article overview

Poetry Ring


Strate, Lance, Winslow, Dale, ETC.: A Review of General Semantics


Language, as Korzybski made clear, can be self-reflexive. We can use language to discuss language, and then we can use language to discuss our language about language. This process can escalate with no end in sight. We can make statements about statements, statements about statements about statements, and so on. We can ask questions about questions, and questions about questions about questions, in infinite recursion. If our words are meant to be mirrors of reality, they can also mirror themselves in much the same way as when two mirrors are held opposite to one another.

Poetry too is subject to the principle of self-reflexiveness. Poets, by the very nature of their craft, live in the world of words and use words to make reference to that world. On one level, poets attempt to appeal to the senses and convey their observations and reflections about the world through their poetry. In the process of doing so, poets reflect on which words and combinations of words will most successfully achieve this goal. In recognizing that emotions and feelings are not separate from thought, poets seek to select language that will effectively and compellingly convey the more subtle extensions of their perceptions and experience.

Readers bring with them their own personal and projective abstractions, and this leads to varying receptions and interpretations of the poem. This is one challenge that provokes poets to pay close attention to their language choices. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Poetry Ring
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.