Women-Owned Businesses No Longer Getting the Cold Shoulder from Banks

By Arndorfer, James B. | American Banker, September 23, 1996 | Go to article overview

Women-Owned Businesses No Longer Getting the Cold Shoulder from Banks


Arndorfer, James B., American Banker


For almost two decades, Minneapolis business owner Cindy Sheffield says, she heard little more than condescending comments from executives of her bank.

This shabby treatment brought her to the boiling point earlier this year when the bank refused to grant her a $300,000 business loan unless she mortgaged her house, her vacation cabin, and her father's house.

"It's because I'm a woman," said Ms. Sheffield, the owner of an employee benefits processing company. When meeting with the bank president, she said, "I felt like he was bouncing me on his knee and patting me on the head every time I went in there."

She decided to switch banks. To her surprise, there were many institutions out there willing to accept her business while treating her with respect.

Some regional banks, mindful of the increase during the last decade in the number of small businesses run by women, have focused on serving their borrowing needs.

One prominent example is Wells, Fargo & Co. of San Francisco. Last September, in partnership with the National Association of Women Business Owners, the bank created a $1 billion loan pool for this market. The three-year program offers variable-rate, unsecured revolving loans.

"All bank management in every area is looking to find market segments to target, and one of the most attractive ones is women-owned businesses," said Charles Wendel, president of New York-based Financial Institutions Consulting. "They're growing very fast."

Mr. Wendel said many of the money-center and regional banks have zeroed in on women entrepreneurs in the last 12 to 18 months.

Last month, Ms. Sheffield took her business to Richfield Bank and Trust, which is pitching itself as a bank for female business owners.

The management of the community bank decided two years ago to target that niche after reading surveys that showed the huge increase in women business owners. It rolled out a program in August targeted at women but available for all business owners.

Sharon Hadary, director of the National Federation of Women Business Owners, said female business owners still have a raft of complaints about their bankers.

Two of the chief gripes voiced in previous surveys: not being taken seriously, and not being able to get credit. But she said that's starting to change.

"What we have seen is that access to capital has been hard to get," Ms. Hadary said. "I think that's changing, and changing a great deal.

"Banks are beginning to realize that if they want to stay in business lending, they're going to need to focus on women."

Figures from the National Federation of Women Business Owners confirm the growing importance of women-owned businesses. According to the Washington-based trade group, there are 7.95 million women-owned small businesses in the United States this year, up 78% from 1987.

Nationally, women-owned firms make up 36% of all companies, employ 26% of all workers, and generate 16% of business sales. …

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