'Henry IV' Heroic, Engaging; Power, Purpose at Folger

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 20, 2008 | Go to article overview

'Henry IV' Heroic, Engaging; Power, Purpose at Folger


Byline: Jayne Blanchard, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Folger's forceful production of 1 Henry IV is very much like the play's hero: comical and waggish in the beginning, but later growing in stature and sense of purpose.

1 Henry IV is the second of Shakespeare's four-part history play cycle that begins with Richard II and is followed by 2 Henry IV and Henry V. The cycle chronicles, with a free hand toward historical facts, the events that led up to the brief reign of England's much-loved King Henry V.

1 Henry IV finds Henry Bollingbroke (Rick Foucheux, who makes Shakespeare's words both immediate and conversational), the newly crowned king, once again at odds with his greatest rival, the Percy family, led by the impetuous young warmonger, Henry Percy, or Hotspur (David Graham Jones). Hotspur and his allies are brewing a rebellion, and Henry IV must gather his loyal men and troops around him. These faithful include his son, Prince Hal (Tom Story), who has been anything but a dutiful and valiant youth like Hotspur.

Prince Hal, on the other hand, has been whooping it up and then some, spending his days in drunkenness and dissolution with his roguish chums in Eastcheap - among them, the incomparable roisterer Falstaff (Delaney Williams, formerly Sgt. Jay Landsman of HBO's The Wire ).

To preserve the throne, Prince Hal has to put aside his boyish ways, gain the trust of his father, and embrace his fate. This transformation from bratty prince to future king is a breathtaking one. In order for it to work, we must feel affection toward Prince Hal in the beginning and a burgeoning sense of reverence at the end. Mr. Story is quite ingratiating as the devilish fair-haired child, reveling in his impudence and supremacy like a toddler with a bowl of ice cream on his head. His sense of mature command takes awhile to develop, but you do get a glimpse of the character's requisite gravity in the final scenes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Henry IV' Heroic, Engaging; Power, Purpose at Folger
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.