Pediatric Sleep Disorders: Validation of the Sleep Disorders Inventory for Students

By Luginbuehl, Marsha; Bradley-Klug, Kathy L. et al. | School Psychology Review, September 2008 | Go to article overview

Pediatric Sleep Disorders: Validation of the Sleep Disorders Inventory for Students


Luginbuehl, Marsha, Bradley-Klug, Kathy L., Ferron, John, Anderson, W. McDowell, Benbadis, Selim R., School Psychology Review


Abstract. Approximately 20%-25% of the pediatric population will likely develop a sleep disorder sometime during childhood or adolescence. Studies have shown that untreated sleep disorders can negatively affect cognitive abilities, and academic and behavior performance. The Sleep Disorders Inventory for Students (SDIS) is a screening instrument designed to be used by school psychologists to determine if problems related to sleep may be affecting a student's educational performance. The SDIS was validated on 821 students in the southeastern United States and seven sleep centers nationally. This study presents the development of both forms of the SDIS, the SDIS--Children's Form and the SDIS--Adolescent Form, as well as the empirical data to support the reliability of the scores and the validity of the inferences. Practical implications for the use of the SDIS are discussed, and suggestions for future research related to the screening of pediatric sleep disorders are presented.

**********

Most professionals working with children and adolescents have limited awareness of pediatric sleep disorders and the growing amount of medical research demonstrating the significant effect these disorders can have on students' cognition, achievement, and behaviors (Friedman, Hendeles-Amitai, & Kozminsky, 2003; Gozal, 1998; Montgomery-Downs, Crabtree, & Gozal, 2005; Taras & Potts-Datema, 2005). Results of a 1999 epidemiologic study suggested that 20%-25% of the pediatric population will develop a sleep disorder sometime in their childhood or adolescence (Mindell, Owens, & Carskadon, 1999). Some sleep disorders will disappear during childhood (Owens, Spirito, McGuinn, & Nobile, 2000). However, in 2001, the National Institute of Health made a conservative estimate, based on numerous pediatric sleep studies, that 12%-15% of all students may have a sleep disorder impairing their daytime functioning that will not disappear without treatment. A random sample of 1,000 parents of elementary-school-aged students indicated that 43% of their children have had sleep difficulties lasting more than 6 months (Kahn et al., 1989). Twelve percent reported that their child was on a sedative to induce sleep, 14% reported a sleep delay longer than 30 min with at least one awakening in the night, and 3.4% said their child had failed at least one grade from sleep problems causing sleepiness or learning delays.

It is estimated that only l%-3% of the pediatric population with a correctable sleep disorder are being referred, accurately diagnosed, and treated (Rosen, Zozula, Jahn, & Carson, 2001). Consequently, the average amount of time that may elapse from onset of a sleep disorder until time of diagnosis and treatment is usually many years, and often not until adulthood. This is partially because many pediatricians, psychologists, and other pediatric professionals have limited knowledge of pediatric sleep disorders and their negative effects on daytime performance and health (Owens, 2001). There is also a need for a pediatric sleep screening instrument with good structural validity and reliability that has been developed for use by school psychologists and other pediatric professionals in school and private practice settings. Without such a screening instrument for use by pediatric professionals to identify the large numbers of children with sleep disorders, many untreated sleep disorders are impairing students' achievement, interpersonal relationships, behaviors, and cognition, and in some cases even preventing high school graduation (Gozal, 1998; Taras & Potts-Datema, 2005; Urschitz et al., 2003). Because sleep disorders are not typically considered a possible cause for school or behavioral-emotional difficulties, numerous research findings suggest that some children with sleep disorders may be inaccurately or prematurely identified as having a learning disability (Gozal, 1998; Guilleminault, Winkle, Korobkin, & Simmons, 1982; Urschitz et al. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Pediatric Sleep Disorders: Validation of the Sleep Disorders Inventory for Students
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.