Lost in Translation? Data Mining, National Security and the "Adverse Inference" Problem

By Ramasastry, Anita | Santa Clara Computer & High Technology Law Journal, May 2006 | Go to article overview

Lost in Translation? Data Mining, National Security and the "Adverse Inference" Problem


Ramasastry, Anita, Santa Clara Computer & High Technology Law Journal


I. INTRODUCTION

Imagine the childhood game of telephone: children sit in a circle and one child whispers a secret in the ear of a child sitting next to him. That "secret" is then relayed to the next child through a whispered remark. Eventually, the secret is relayed through the entire chain of children, as if multiple telephone calls had been placed, and a message relayed to numerous parties. Very often, the message that is relayed to the last child in the chain is very different from the original secret conveyed. The message has gotten distorted and lost in translation. Why? As data gets shared with a wider circle of people and multiple human actors have been asked to interpret and relay a message, as they understood it, to new people, the original message gets lost in translation. (1)

Today, a giant game of telephone is going on with our personal data. Our personal data, which we might disclose to a bank clerk over a counter, or provide to a customer service representative over the telephone, ends up far away from where it first started. Through a process known as data aggregation, messages about who we are and records containing our personal identifiers are being compiled from many sources, and this aggregated data is being transferred to third parties at a rapid speed. During this process of travel and aggregation, a seemingly inconsequential disclosure of a phone number to a store clerk can snowball into an "enhanced" file. Such files are reformatted, edited, analyzed, interpreted, and changed to include volumes of information about a household, personal interests, and even medical conditions.

Often, we have little control over the messages that are being conveyed because we are not privy to this process--it happens behind the scenes. It is only recently that the American public has begun to realize that they have little control over their personal information once it is shared with a third party. And this has become of even greater concern now that we know that the federal government may be at the end of a "telephone" chain, reviewing personal data in order to combat terrorism.

Since September 11, 2001, the federal government has tried to connect more "dots" (data points) to prevent terrorism--by piecing together pieces of information and data to uncover possible plots and patterns. As part of this effort, the Executive Branch has introduced various proposals to "mine" private sector commercial databases and public records (as well as public databases) for information on everything from consumer addresses to financial and credit profiles. Such information, when fed into computers and analyzed, is meant to help the U.S. government predict who might be involved in terrorist activity. (2)

Data mining is a technique that uses information technology to identify previously undisclosed patterns and connections between different points of existing data, often with the goal of predicting future behavior. (3) In the world of commerce, this is done to maximize profit and to improve consumer experience. In recent years, the business of data collection has expanded with the rise of commercial data brokers--companies that aggregate consumer data from a wide variety of records, both public and private. Such data is then combined to create robust and detailed profiles on consumers. Data brokers may aggregate everything from cell phone records to travel reservations. (4) The government often purchases consumer data from such data brokers for varied purposes. (5) Law enforcement, for example, might want to try and locate the addresses of persons with outstanding arrest warrants.

Civil rights advocates have declared that governmental use of private sector data is a serious infringement on the right to privacy. One of the reasons for this declaration is that government now has access to vast "digital dossiers" maintained by commercial data brokers. (6) These private sector dossiers are available for purchase and reveal a great deal about our habits, patterns and daily activities. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Lost in Translation? Data Mining, National Security and the "Adverse Inference" Problem
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.