Community Reactions to Reproductive Health Care at Three School-Based Clinics in Louisiana

By Zeanah, Paula D.; Morse, Edward V. et al. | Journal of School Health, September 1996 | Go to article overview

Community Reactions to Reproductive Health Care at Three School-Based Clinics in Louisiana


Zeanah, Paula D., Morse, Edward V., Simon, Patricia M., Stock, Mary, Pratt, Jo Lynn, Sterne, Sylvia, Journal of School Health


School-based health care for adolescents provides a convenient and practical way to provide health care to a population at risk for numerous health and mental health problems.[1-3] The constellation of services provided across school-based health centers (SBHCs) varies, and is determined by many factors including availability of other health services, financial support for the SBHC, and the health profile of the students. In addition, needs and preferences of the local community are crucial factors in determining whether SBHCs are developed at all.[1,4,5] Among the topics which may focus a community's concerns regarding school-based health care for students, perhaps none proves more controversial than provision of reproductive health services.[1,4,5]

Reproductive health services range from routine gynecological examinations, pregnancy testing, and the diagnosis and treatment of sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs), to the provision of or referral for contraceptive counseling and care, and pre- and postnatal care. Controversies may arise over the appropriateness of the school as a place to provide sexuality education and care, privacy and confidentiality of all health-related services, role of parents in school-based health care, and influence of schools in the private lives of teen-agers and their families. Social needs, political agendas, and religious beliefs affect a community's readiness to address adolescent reproductive health care.[1,4,5]

TEEN-AGE SEXUAL BEHAVIOR

Consequences of teen-age sexual behavior are recognized as significant public health problems affecting the social, physical, and economic welfare of adolescents. Although the sexual activity rates of American teens are comparable to rates in other western countries, the United States has one of the highest teen-age birth rates.[6,7]

Pregnancy during adolescence permanently and significantly changes the future outlook of a young person's life. Teen parents are less likely to complete school, or maximize their lifetime earning potential.[8] Adolescent pregnancy is associated with significant prenatal medical problems; babies born to adolescents are at risk for numerous medical problems, including abuse and neglect,[9] developmental and cognitive delays and behavior problems, and increased mortality in the first few years of life.[6-8] The cost to taxpayers to care for families started when the mother was a teen-ager has escalated greatly; the estimate was $29.28 billion in 1991, compared to $19.83 billion in 1988.[7]

In addition to pregnancy, sexually active adolescents are at risk for contracting STDs. Currently, 3 million teens become infected with STDs each year, and the highest rates of gonorrhea and syphilis are found among teen-age girls.[9] AIDS is now the sixth leading cause of death for those ages 15-24.[10]

Early sexual activity coexists with other high-risk behaviors such as smoking, alcohol, and drug use. Adolescents who engage in these activities are more likely to have a poor academic performance, be truant, and engage in antisocial activities.[11,12] Contextual factors associated with early sexual activity include peer and family influences, and broader socio-cultural expectations and norms.[10-12]

Despite potentially devastating health risks, adolescents often do not seek adequate medical care. Confidence in health care providers, convenience, and confidentiality are fundamental factors that increase the likelihood that teenagers will use health services.[13] Attitudes and beliefs about health, sexuality, and sexual behavior also determine whether adolescents seek physical and mental health care.[14,15] Interestingly, SBHC users tend to be adolescents who engage in these high-risk behaviors although they may initially present with acute medical problems.[16-18]

SCHOOL-BASED HEALTH CARE

The prototypical SBHC was developed in St. Paul, Minn., in 1973 primarily to address the high rate of adolescent pregnancies. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Community Reactions to Reproductive Health Care at Three School-Based Clinics in Louisiana
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.