Eu-Russia Permanent Partnership Council : Talks Sign off Ninth Progress Report

Europe-East, October 27, 2008 | Go to article overview

Eu-Russia Permanent Partnership Council : Talks Sign off Ninth Progress Report


The EU-Russia Permanent Partnership Council (PPC) reached little concrete progress at a brief morning session organised by the French EU Presidency, on 8 October in Paris.

According to the European Commission, the main deliverable of the EU-Russia energy summit was agreement on a ninth progress report on the EU-Russia Energy Dialogue. Both sides also acknowledged the need to analyse the impact of the current financial crisis in the energy sector due to the sector's capital intensive nature. The dialogue had three main elements, developed by thematic working groups. Firstly, the strategies and scenarios' working group discussed forecasts for demand and offer. The EU side called for detailed information on production capacity in the Russian gas fields. Europeans want the Russians to be clearer on their plans for investments in the future.

Whilst Russia was acknowledged - on paper - as a reliable supplier, at least for large countries such as Germany, there are concerns as to whether Gazprom will be able to produce enough gas to satisfy growing internal demand and foreign demand as well. The Czech Presidency, having suffered mysterious' cuts in energy supplies from Russia following the signature of an agreement with the US concerning the anti-missile radar system, stressed that further development of the Early Warning Mechanism would be a priority for their Presidency. There will also be more work on offer and demand scenarios from now to 2030.

As for market developments', the EU officially "welcomed" measures taken by Russia as to the liberalisation of the electricity market in the Russian Federation. …

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