Russia Today: Youth Served; Moves in after the Soviet Collapse

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 27, 2008 | Go to article overview

Russia Today: Youth Served; Moves in after the Soviet Collapse


Byline: Kara Rowland, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Margarita Simonyan acknowledges that she was rather young, at 25, to be given the reins of Russia Today three years ago.

The editor in chief of Russia's English-language television network was one of many who benefited from an abundance of opportunities for young journalists after the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Basically everybody who used to work in Soviet journalism lost their jobs, she says. They preferred to hire people with no experience. You would even find announcements of jobs available where it would say, 'We're looking for journalists with no experience, please.'"

Now 28, she has been a working journalist for a decade, having juggled her college course work with the demands of her first job as a correspondent for Rossiya, one of Russia's main TV stations. Based in the country's southern region, Ms. Simonyan reported on the war with Chechnya.

Years of seeing and writing about bloodshed causes one to grow a bit not so perceptive, she says. That changed in September 2004, when Chechen terrorists invaded a secondary school in Beslan, a town in North Ossetia. Ms. Simonyan was one of the first journalists to arrive at the horrific scene.

After a two-day siege, 334 people died - 186 of them children.

It was the worst thing that ever happened to me, she says. Beslan was absolutely something different. I remember every time I wrote my stories, I couldn't write because I cried and the paper became wet, and obviously I couldn't write anymore.

Ms. Simonyan later relocated to Moscow, where she joined the pool of reporters covering the Kremlin. After about a year of covering President Vladimir Putin, she was tapped to lead a new television channel. Its mission: to present the news from Russia's point of view to English-speaking audiences.

The purpose is mainly to tell the world about Russia, what sort of country we are, why what's happening is happening, to explain things that might not be so obvious and also to give an alternative view of the world, she says.

This is necessary, she says, because there is persistent bias against the country throughout the world - particularly in the Western media.

There's a lot of misunderstanding. A lot. And it's everybody's fault, actually, she says. The journalists who write about Russia sometimes cannot abandon their stereotypes, sort of just realize that it's a different, different, different country right now. Whatever is going on is sometimes perceived as the old Soviet ways rather than make an attempt into looking into the details, the nuances of what's going on.

At the same time, Russia does not always explain itself well, she says.

We feel that if we are right, we do not defend ourselves, we do not explain ourselves, she says. By doing that, you sort of admit that you are wrong. That's the mentality.

Russia Today, funded by the state news agency RIA-Novosti, first aired in late 2005. Critics didn't wait for its first broadcast to question its objectivity or dismiss it as a mouthpiece of the government. …

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