In Face of Large-Scale Killings, Urgent Calls for Dialogue and Contingency Planning

UN Chronicle, Summer 1996 | Go to article overview

In Face of Large-Scale Killings, Urgent Calls for Dialogue and Contingency Planning


Gravely concerned at the continued deterioration of the security situation in Burundi, which had resulted in further "large-scale killings" in Buhoro and Kivyuka, and at the increasing flow of refugees from the country, the Security Council on 15 May condemned any use of violence and called again for a comprehensive political dialogue aimed at national reconciliation.

Burundian authorities and all parties concerned should "set aside their differences, renounce the use of force and demonstrate a firm political will for a prompt settlement of the conflict, the Council urged. It also called on the parties to refrain from actions that could aggravate the refugee problem, and expressed concern that relief organizations had been prevented from delivering humanitarian and development assistance in Burundi.

In a statement (S/PRST/1996/24) by its President, Qin Huasun of China, the Council asked Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali and interested Member States "to continue to facilitate, as a matter of urgency, contingency planning for a rapid humanitarian response in the event of widespread violence or a serious deterioration in the humanitarian situation" in the strife-torn Central African country. Mr. Boutros-Ghali was also encouraged to pursue planning for steps that might be taken to support a possible political agreement. The Council had called for contingency planning on 5 March under resolution 1049 (1996).

The Council once again voiced support for the ongoing efforts of Julius Nyerere, former President of the United Republic of Tanzania, to resolve the crisis and called on all parties to use an upcoming meeting which he had helped to arrange for 22 May in Mwanza, Tanzania, to move forward on national reconciliation. It further called on all States concerned to cooperate in the convening of a regional conference on peace, security and development in the Great Lakes region.

The Council stressed its readiness to consider still further measures, "should the parties fail to demonstrate the necessary political will for a peaceful solution to the crisis".

`Downward spiral of violence'

In a 3 May report (S/1996/335), the Secretary-General had cited persistent reports indicating a "downward spiral of violence". Extremist Hutu rebels, apparently infiltrated from Zaire, were undertaking hit-and-run attacks against Tutsi and moderate Hutu civilians. Burundian armed forces sometimes exacted reprisals against Hutu civilians in the areas where attacks had taken place, "thus reinforcing the propaganda of those who control the extremists", the Secretary-General stressed. He called for the creation of a genuine, effective coalition Government as the only way to break the present "vicious circle".

Under such disturbing circumstances, Mr. Boutros-Ghali remained "convinced of the necessity for the international community to proceed with contingency planning for a possible military intervention to save lives if disaster should strike Burundi and lead to large-scale killing of civilians". The intervention would be exclusively to save civilian lives. "If the worst happened, Member States might find that they had no alternative but to deploy a multinational force authorized by the Security Council under Chapter VII of the UN Charter", he said, adding that it was therefore "sensible" to undertake preliminary planning. Planning for a UN peace-keeping operation under Chapter VI was also under way, in the event that the Burundian parties might reach a political agreement and seek UN help in implementing it.

Member States had agreed that contingency planning for other eventualities, including a worst-case scenario, should also proceed, Mr. Boutros-Ghali said. A number of countries had expressed readiness in principle to consider contributing troops, provided certain conditions were fulfilled. Other Members had also expressed readiness in principle to consider providing assistance for intervention. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

In Face of Large-Scale Killings, Urgent Calls for Dialogue and Contingency Planning
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.