Pure Poetry: Artist Parviz Payghamy's Poetic Voice Shines through in His Abstract Landscape Works

By Wiley, Jennifer Dulin | Art Business News, October 2008 | Go to article overview

Pure Poetry: Artist Parviz Payghamy's Poetic Voice Shines through in His Abstract Landscape Works


Wiley, Jennifer Dulin, Art Business News


The art of Parviz Payghamy is poetry, woven in vibrant color and melodic composition, rather than verses and words. The rhythmic curves and rich patterns of the Iranian artist"s abstract landscapes tell the story of life's fleeting beauty in a form of visual poetry that speaks to viewers of all walks of life.

"I do with paintings what poets do with words," Payghamy explains. "My paintings are visualizations of life's happiness and sadness, and all of these emotions are translated by means of lines, shape, color and form. A picture is made, and that is how the artist communicates his inner self with the viewer."

So inspired are his abstract landscapes with the rhythmic art form that Payghamy was dubbed "the poet painter" by his friends and colleagues at Tehran University, where he received his degree in fine art. However, the artist showed an innate artistic talent much earlier as a young boy growing up in Iran. His brother and grandfather both possessed the talent, but it was Payghamy who began training in art at age 12 and sold his first painting at age 16.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The work of Van Gogh and Paul Klee influenced his artistic sensibility when he got to Tehran University, and elements of Payghamy's intelligent use of color can still be seen in his works today. After graduation, the burgeoning artist began looking for artistic opportunities outside Iran because of the unwelcoming attitude the Iranian government held towards artists and their works. A gallery in Canada gave Payghamy his first break, offering him a spot in a group exhibition, which opened to great success.

The artist continued honing his craft, exhibiting in Iran, Europe, Canada and the United States, but the lack of acceptance and support for artists in Iran eventually prompted Payghamy to move to the United States.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"There is so much more interest and appreciation for art in the United States," Payghamy says. "I saw Hollywood for the first time and realized how very different my life would be. The lifestyle, the people--I'd never seen anything like it."

Payghamy's artwork took a cue from his new environment. Suddenly, his colors were brighter and more intense; his compositions were more passionate, inspired by the foreign landscape of his new home. At the same time, his poetic influences grew even stronger, clinging to the heritage that he still knew and loved.

"I was able to express myself more and take inspiration from the open space and new architecture," Payghamy says. "Life was more comfortable, and I wasn't under any pressure."

Payghamy flourished in his Los Angeles home, feeling that he could truly portray the joy and beauty of life now that he was living it. …

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