Myths and Facts about Domestic Violence

By Breen, Katey | The Florida Times Union, October 25, 2008 | Go to article overview

Myths and Facts about Domestic Violence


Breen, Katey, The Florida Times Union


Byline: KATEY BREEN

When trying to understand community issues, it is easy to make assumptions. Domestic violence is no exception. In observance of October Domestic Violence Awareness Month, here are some of the more prevalent myths which need to be replaced by facts.

Myth: Domestic violence is a "loss of control."

Fact: Violent behavior is a choice. Perpetrators use it to control their victims. Domestic violence is about batterers using their control, not losing their control. Their actions are very deliberate.

Myth: The victim is responsible for the violence because she provokes it.

Fact: No one asks to be abused. And no one deserves to be abused regardless of what they say or do.

Myth: If the victim didn't like it, she would leave.

Fact: Victims do not like the abuse. They stay in the relationship for many reasons, including fear and the threat of abuse to their children. Most do eventually leave.

Myth: Domestic violence only occurs in a small percentage of relationships.

Fact: Estimates are that domestic violence occurs in one fourth to half of all intimate relationships. This applies to heterosexual as well as same-sex relationships and all ages.

Myth: Middle- and upper-class women do not get battered as frequently as poor women. …

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