Question: Is Motor Learning Applicable to Practitioners?

JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, October 1996 | Go to article overview

Question: Is Motor Learning Applicable to Practitioners?


YOU ARE AN ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHER in an urban school district. You have been an elementary physical education teacher for four years. You teach physical education in a school with 400 children, preschool through grade 6. Among these students are several mainstreamed children with mental and physical disabilities. You teach physical education twice a week for 45 minutes. This 45-minute time period is the classroom teacher's planning period. You also coach a track team of fourth, fifth, and sixth graders; coach football for the fifth- and sixth-grade boys; and direct a dance group of third, fourth, fifth, and sixth graders.

A representative from AAHPERD has requested an interview on why motor learning is important to physical education teachers. Your position is that motor learning is not important to elementary physical educators for the following reasons:

* Physical educators need to focus on content development with children and youth at various stages of development. Within one grade there are wide variations in skill level.

* Theoretical courses are not relevant to the day-to-day teaching of physical education. As an undergraduate physical education major, you did not learn to apply any motor learning concepts to real-world problems.

* Researchers in their ivory towers do not make information applicable for teachers in the trenches.

* The state physical education curriculum is developed without information about the application of principles and theories.

Whether or not you believe this position, argue for it as strongly as you can. Use arguments that make sense and are rational. Be creative and invent new supporting arguments. Remember to learn the rationale for both your position and the researchers' position. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Question: Is Motor Learning Applicable to Practitioners?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.