Wells, 31 Others Ease Downloading of Account Data from Internet

By Clark, Drew | American Banker, November 21, 1996 | Go to article overview

Wells, 31 Others Ease Downloading of Account Data from Internet


Clark, Drew, American Banker


Wells Fargo & Co. and 31 community banks and credit unions announced that their customers will be able to download account information from the Internet with the click of a button.

The technology is one of the first uses of Microsoft Corp.'s set of standards for electronic financial connections, which were introduced last March.

Called Active Statement Technology, advocates say that it will simplify the process of transferring account files from the World Wide Web to personal financial software programs.

Making data on Web sites easier to download is likely to encourage banking customers to go to the sites, industry observers said. That, in turn, would offer banks more chance to promote their services on the Internet.

"Today we offer both our Quicken and our Microsoft Money customers the ability to download information into their software spreadsheets," said Wells Fargo spokeswoman Janet Otsuki. But the features of Microsoft's new technology "will allow Money customers to have a more direct and more efficient downloading experience."

The benefits of that arrangement are hardly accidental from the standpoint of Microsoft, which has been aggressively battling Intuit Inc. for a greater share of the personal financial software market. Intuit's Quicken leads Money by 75% to 20%, according to a recent independent consumer study.

Microsoft offers its technology for free to all financial institutions, and it encourages banks to link their Web sites so that their customers will find a trial offer for the Money product.

Competing Web browsers will be able to download financial data, but Microsoft Money 97 is the only financial software able automatically to receive the information. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Wells, 31 Others Ease Downloading of Account Data from Internet
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.