Big News and Big Ideas

Foreign Policy, November-December 2008 | Go to article overview

Big News and Big Ideas


We normally use this page to highlight some of the big ideas our readers will encounter in the magazine. This time, we are making an exception to share some important news: FOREIGN POLICY has a new home. We are thrilled to announce that on October 1, our magazine was purchased by the Washington Post Company from its longtime owner, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

For nearly four decades, the Carnegie Endowment's generous and unwavering support allowed FOREIGN POLICY to become what it is today--an award-winning publication recognized for the quality of its content and the caliber of its writers. We are also proud that FP enjoys a growing, enthusiastic, and global audience, with editions in nine languages and readers in more than 160 countries.

FP's success would not have been possible without Carnegie's recognition that editorial excellence depends on intellectual independence. As editors, we not only enjoyed Carnegie's material support but, just as important, we were given the freedom to pursue big ideas regardless of any consideration other than their importance, rigor; and originality. In a competitive marketplace of ideas that is international and instantaneous, we know we will only attract and retain readers by presenting the most important ideas about global politics and economics in a way that challenges the common wisdom and stimulates new thinking.

This approach has served us well. It stands at the core of the reasons that led the Washington Post Company to buy FP. At a time in which print publications are challenged by the Internet, our new owner recognizes that quality content matters more than its format. …

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