The 2008 Global Cities Index: Cities Bear the Brunt of the World's Financial Meltdowns, Crime Waves, and Climate Crises in Ways National Governments Never Will. So, When Foreign Policy, A.T. Kearny, and the Chicago Council on Global Affairs Teamed Up to Measure Globalization around the World, We Focused on the 60 Cities That Shape Our Lives the Most

Foreign Policy, November-December 2008 | Go to article overview

The 2008 Global Cities Index: Cities Bear the Brunt of the World's Financial Meltdowns, Crime Waves, and Climate Crises in Ways National Governments Never Will. So, When Foreign Policy, A.T. Kearny, and the Chicago Council on Global Affairs Teamed Up to Measure Globalization around the World, We Focused on the 60 Cities That Shape Our Lives the Most


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National governments may shape the broad outlines of globalization, but where does it really play out? Where are globalization's successes and failures most acute? Where else but the places where most of humanity now chooses to live and work--cities. The world's biggest, most interconnected cities help set global agendas, weather transnational dangers, and serve as the hubs of global integration. They are the engines of growth for their countries and the gateways to the resources of their regions. In many ways, the story of globalization is the story of urbanization.

But what makes a "global city"? The term itself conjures a command center for the cognoscenti. It means power, sophistication, wealth, and influence. To call a global city your own suggests that the ideas and values of your metropolis shape the world. And, to a large extent, that's true. The cities that host the biggest capital markets, elite universities, most diverse and well-educated populations, wealthiest multinationals, and most powerful international organizations are connected to the rest of the world like nowhere else. But, more than anything, the cities that rise to the top of the list are those that continue to forge global links despite intensely complex economic environments. They are the ones making urbanization work to their advantage by providing the vast opportunities of global integration to their people; measuring cities' international presence captures the most accurate picture of the way the world works.

So, FOREIGN POLICY teamed up with A.T. Kearney and The Chicago Council on Global Affairs to create the Global Cities Index, a uniquely comprehensive ranking of the ways in which cities are integrating with the rest of the world. In constructing this index of the world's most global cities, we have collected and analyzed a broad array of data, as well as tapped the brainpower of such renowned cities experts as Saskia Sassen, Witold Rybczynski, Janet Abu-Lughod, and Peter Taylor.

Specifically, the Global Cities Index ranks cities' metro areas according to 24 metrics across five dimensions. The first is business activity: including the value of its capital markets, the number of Fortune Global 500 firms headquartered there, and the volume of the goods that pass through the city. The second dimension measures human capital, or how well the city acts as a magnet for diverse groups of people and talent. This includes the size of a city's immigrant population, the number of international schools, and the percentage of residents with university degrees. The third dimension is information exchange--how well news and information is dispersed about and to the rest of the world. The number of international news bureaus, the amount of international news in the leading local papers, and the number of broadband subscribers round out that dimension.

The final two areas of analysis are unusual for most rankings of globalized cities or states. The fourth is cultural experience, or the level of diverse attractions for international residents and travelers. That includes everything from how many major sporting events a city hosts to the number of performing arts venues it boasts. The final dimension--political engagement--measures the degree to which a city influences global policymaking and dialogue. How? By examining the number of embassies and consulates, major think tanks, international organizations, sister city relationships, and political conferences a city hosts. We learned long ago that globalization is much more than the simple lowering of market barriers and economic walls. And because the Global Cities Index pulls in these measures of cultural, social, and policy indicators, it offers a more complete picture of a city's global standing--not simply economic or financial ties.

The 60 cities included in this first Global Cities Index run the gamut of the modern urban experience. …

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The 2008 Global Cities Index: Cities Bear the Brunt of the World's Financial Meltdowns, Crime Waves, and Climate Crises in Ways National Governments Never Will. So, When Foreign Policy, A.T. Kearny, and the Chicago Council on Global Affairs Teamed Up to Measure Globalization around the World, We Focused on the 60 Cities That Shape Our Lives the Most
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