Lines from Arrowhead: 2008

By Owens, Carole | Leviathan, October 2008 | Go to article overview

Lines from Arrowhead: 2008


Owens, Carole, Leviathan


The year 2008 will be exciting at Arrowhead, and we at the Berkshire Historical Society (BHS) want you to know what is happening. The Board of Directors has approved a number of new major initiatives.

The Barn

First, BHS plans to add a new barn to Arrowhead, the 44-acre property at 780 Holmes Road, Pittsfield. Melville's house, a Registered National Historic Landmark and American Association of Museums accredited museum, is the only secure structure on the property. For that reason, Arrowhead has served as both house museum and archival storage space, a situation that has become untenable as permanent gifts to the collection have increased. The collection of period artifacts was not stored under proper conditions or in adequate space; the house museum itself, our most valuable artifact, was being stressed, and the number of rooms open to the public was limited. The challenge was clear. In order to protect the collection, reduce wear on the fabric of the house, and open more rooms to create an optimal experience for visitors, it was absolutely necessary to move the collection out of the house museum. An additional building on the property would ensure proper storage of the collection and an enhanced visitor experience.

Herman Melville purchased the 160-acre property in 1850 for $6500 and lived there until 1863, when he sold the entire property to his brother Allan. From 1863 until 1927, Arrowhead was owned and occupied by Melville family members: first Allan, and later Mrs. W. B. Morewood, daughter of Allan and niece of Herman. A letter written by Mrs. Morewood in October 1925 describes the grounds:

   Arrowhead, our property in Pittsfield, was bought by my uncle,
   Herman Melville in 1850. It was [purchased] by my father some
   fifteen years later.... When it came to me ... there were 80 acres,
   rented in short leases. The hams go with one lease. There is a
   two-car garage.... There are five open fireplaces & we also used
   stoves in dining room & bedrooms in the fall. Living room, library,
   dining room, large pantry, kitchen, laundry, seven bedrooms, store
   room. bath, sink room on 2nd floor & one bedroom & attic on the 3rd
   floor. The roof is ill perfect condition. I put in a new one this
   fall ... Very truly M. G. Morewood.

   (Mrs. William B. Morewood from the Henry A. Murray Papers, Harvard
   University Archives; transcribed by Dennis Marnon)

Clearly, the public experience would be greatly enhanced if additional rooms were opened to more closely approximate the seven-bedroom house that the Herman Melville family and subsequent Melville family members knew.

The buildings currently on the Arrowhead property are the home of Herman Melville, with only six rooms open to the public; an outbuilding approximately 12 x24 feet that was Mrs. Morewood's garage and is now used as the visitor's center and gift shop: and one early nineteenth-century, long-side barn, 30 x 40 feet, on the property during Melville's tenancy, currently used as summer exhibition space. (A Millennium Trail, inaugurated in 2000, offers a one-mile ramble over fields and through the woods, tracing Melville's steps as he walked from Arrowhead to Broad Hall.) In December 2006, BHS learned through Preservation Mass of a 3800-square-foot barn available for $1. Built around 1850, it derives from Melville's day, resembles in size, number of stories, and details like the cupola, the barn already on the property, and would help recreate the two-barn farmyard of Melville's tenancy. The barn is large enough to accommodate both BHS exhibitions and the storage of its 600 linear feet of documents and 5000 artifacts currently in the house museum, thus allowing us to open the upstairs rooms in the house to the public. In May, 2007, with a grant from the National Endowment of Humanities, BHS sponsored a Melville symposium in which various scholars discussed new ways to present Melville's Arrowhead to the public in light of the enhancement the new barn will bring. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Lines from Arrowhead: 2008
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.