Review of Stefan Horlacher, Masculinities. Konzeptionen Von Mannlichkeit Im Werk Von Thomas Hardy Und D. H. Lawrence

By Mergenthal, Silvia | Journal of Men, Masculinities and Spirituality, January 2008 | Go to article overview

Review of Stefan Horlacher, Masculinities. Konzeptionen Von Mannlichkeit Im Werk Von Thomas Hardy Und D. H. Lawrence


Mergenthal, Silvia, Journal of Men, Masculinities and Spirituality


Review of Stefan Horlacher, Masculinities. Konzeptionen von Mannlichkeit im Werk von Thomas Hardy und D. H. Lawrence [Masculinities: Conceptions of Masculinity in the Works of Thomas Hardy and D. H. Lawrence] (Tubingen: Gunter Narr, 2006), vi + 721 pp.

Stefan Horlacher's magisterial study of conceptions of masculinity in the works of Thomas Hardy and D. H. Lawrence proceeds from two initial observations: first, Horlacher suggests that contemporary social and cultural phenomena such as drug-abuse and violence by and among men, or the success story of Viagra, or, for another example, the co-existence in popular culture of icons of masculinity as divergent as Michael Jackson and Arnold Schwarzenegger, can be traced back to fundamental insecurities regarding traditional masculine role models and identities. However, in his analyses of, centrally, Thomas Hardy's novel Jude the Obscure and D. H. Lawrence's Sons and Lovers, Horlacher argues that the authors of these two novels and their contemporaries in the late 19th and early 20th centuries were as troubled by gender as their late 20th and early 21st century descendants, and that their texts both reflect complex processes of male identity formation, and create spaces in which solutions to problems of identity formation can be imagined. If, as Horlacher, following Stephen Greenblatt and Clifford Geertz, argues, culture can be regarded as textual in nature, and if an individual's experience, including his or her sexual identity, is always and invariably mediated by language, then a literary text can, and does, offer privileged first-hand insight into the human mind.

Horlacher's second observation is less general in nature and serves to situate his own work in the contexts of, on the one hand, traditional literary criticism and, on the other, Men's Studies. While literary scholars have always been interested in male fictional characters, they do not, as yet, consistently read them as historically variable cultural constructs, although, under the twin influences of initially Women's and later Gender Studies, they have learned to do so with regard to female fictional characters; hence, male fictional characters, Horlacher contends, are still often seen as representing universal human norms. In Men's Studies, of course, scholars do not subscribe to this universalistic view, but conceive of the male subject as decentered, and stress the performative aspects of gender; however, they do not, by and large, employ the vocabulary of literary criticism, or draw on literary theory. Horlacher's plea, therefore is for an interdisciplinary approach to literary representations of masculinity, an approach which would integrate components from Men's Studies, Gender Studies, Cultural Studies, history, cultural anthropology, sociology, psychoanalysis, deconstructionism, and New Historicism. His own approach is, indeed, broadly interdisciplinary in nature, though there is a distinct, and perhaps inevitable, bias towards the theoretical frameworks of psychoanalysis and deconstructionism, specifically, towards the theories of Lacan and Derrida. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Review of Stefan Horlacher, Masculinities. Konzeptionen Von Mannlichkeit Im Werk Von Thomas Hardy Und D. H. Lawrence
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.