Bumps in the Bible Market

The Christian Century, November 20, 1996 | Go to article overview

Bumps in the Bible Market


CLAIMS THAT Bible sales in the U.S. have fallen markedly this year have prompted questions as to whether the proliferation of so many different, specialized versions is causing confusion among would-be buyers. A recent survey of commercial publishers undertaken by the New York Times suggests a decline in sales. But two leading organizations - the National Council of Churches and the American Bible Society - say their figures are more encouraging.

"We don't see any numbers that give us concern," said David Lull, a United Methodist minister who recently became the NCC's director of Bible translation and utilization. The NCC sponsored the Revised Standard Version, published in 1952, and a 1989 revision, the New Revised Standard Version. Lull noted that though he had seen royalty figures only for the first quarter of this year, he found them "at least holding even or ahead of the prior year."

Michael Maus, communications officer for the ABS, said its sales of a new translation issued last year, the Contemporary English Version, were up by 42 percent this year-partly the result of a special promotional effort. "In our most recent fiscal year, ending June 30, 1996, ABS's overall scripture sales were up 15 percent," he said.

However, in an October 28 New York Times article titled "A strangely sluggish season for marketing God's word," figures quoted from the Association of American Publishers showed Bibles sales down 9 percent so far this year compared with the same period in 1995. Sales were down 42 percent for the month of June, a month in which many Americans traditionally give Bibles as graduation and wedding gifts. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Bumps in the Bible Market
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.