Kickin' Asthma: School-Based Asthma Education in an Urban Community

By Magzamen, Sheryl; Patel, Bina et al. | Journal of School Health, December 2008 | Go to article overview

Kickin' Asthma: School-Based Asthma Education in an Urban Community


Magzamen, Sheryl, Patel, Bina, Davis, Adam, Edelstein, Joan, Tager, Ira B., Journal of School Health


Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood. 1,2 In the United States, approximately 12% of children younger than 18 years have been diagnosed with asthma. (3) Asthma is the leading cause of school absences due to a chronic disease and accounts for 3 times more lost school days than any other cause. (4,5) Asthma also is associated with low academic achievement and high likelihood of grade retention. (6-8)

Asthma has a substantial impact on urban school districts that serve a large proportion of nonwhite and impoverished children. (9) Asthma-related morbidity, as measured by school absences, hospitalizations, and outpatient emergency care, has been found to be disproportionately high among children living in poverty, (10-13) as well as black and Latino children. (2,14-17) Morbidity in nonwhite and impoverished populations has been explained by many factors that include lack of access to primary care, (18) substandard primary care, (19) characteristics of the social environment, (15,20) and physical environment, (21,22) as well as the perception of asthma as an acute rather than chronic disease. (4,23)

Schools in urban communities are logical places to conduct asthma education interventions. Schools are centrally organized locations with broad community access. Previous studies have found that school-based asthma education is cost-effective and garners higher attendance rates compared to clinic-based programs, particularly in urban settings. (4,24,25) School-based asthma education eliminates issues related to transportation, limited access to health care providers, and lack of parental awareness or knowledge of asthma. Since asthma-related absences also impose a burden on school systems due to the relation between average daily attendance and funding, school systems have a stake in minimizing the financial and educational impact of asthma on students.

As part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-funded Controlling Asthma in American Cities Project, Oakland Kicks Asthma (OKA) (joint venture between the American Lung Association [ALA] of California, University of California, Berkeley, Children's Hospital Oakland, and Oakland Unified School District [OUSD]) conducted a school-based asthma program for adolescent students enrolled in OUSD middle schools and high schools. Adolescent students (aged 1 I-18 years) have been targeted specifically for services for several reasons. Although hospitalizations and emergency room visits due to asthma are highest at younger ages, (16) adolescents have a higher prevalence of asthma, suffer more frequent exacerbations, and have more near-fatal episodes compared to younger children. (26,27) Increased morbidity may be explained partly by the fact that parents and guardians may have reduced roles in the management of the child's health as the child matures. However, adolescents often may not be prepared to assume the full responsibility for self-management. (28) Further, adolescents face logistical and financial obstacles, such as inadequate transportation, that hinder their capacity to receive care or education independent of parents or guardians. Often, clinical care cannot be provided without parental consent, which, in some cases, may pose a barrier. Despite the added challenges faced by adolescents, relatively few programs and resources have been developed for students with asthma in this age-group. Although programs have specifically been developed for adolescents, (26) there are no interventions that target the unique health and social needs of urban adolescents.

The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the first 3 years of a school-based asthma education program, entitled Kickin" Asthma, that targeted middle school and high school students with asthma in the OUSD. The specific aims of this analysis are to ascertain if school-based asthma education significantly reduced asthma symptoms, asthma-related acute care utilization, and school absences among children identified with asthma. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Kickin' Asthma: School-Based Asthma Education in an Urban Community
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.